Orangemen Who Served on Toronto City Council

This list produced some new insights to the strength of the Orange Association in Toronto and their ability to elect their candidates. It shatters the myth that the Orangemen voted as a unified force. Time after time Orangemen found that their main opponents in an election campaign were also Orangemen. It also shows that far from all Orangemen being right wing in their politics the opposite is true. From far right politicians such as Leslie Saunders to left wing members such as James Simpson the Association was well represented.

The election of 1915 showed just how much “brotherly spirit” existed between Orangemen who opposed each other at election time. At a meeting in Victoria Hall for the Ward 3 candidates, on December 24, 1915 to debate the various issues and state their platform a brawl broke out. All meeting long there had been a fair amount of heckling from a group of voters that gave off a strong odour of whisky. When it came turn for Sam McBride to speak he teed off on candidate Jimmy Simpson. He accused Simpson of being a national socialist and a supporter of Germany and a friend of the Kaiser. Simpson’s brother Richard, shouted “You’re a liar McBride” and the crowd seemed to wake up. McBride wasn’t finished, he next accused Simpson of hating the Union Jack and wanting it taken down in all Toronto schools. This proved too much for Simpson’s brother who rushed to the front of the hall and screamed liar over and over at McBride. McBride jumped down off of the stage and grabbed Simpson by the shirt collar and rammed him up against the wall. They were soon separated and McBride went back onto the stage and shouted into the microphone MERRY CHRISTMAS and GOODNIGHT. He left and fights broke out all over the hall. The odd thing about this whole comic opera was that Jimmy Simpson wasn’t a candidate for Ward 3 – he was running for a seat on the Board of Control.

In 1925 Don MacGregor, who was a music teacher and was serving on Toronto’s Board of Control, waited outside of a committee Room where the council’s property committee was meeting. When the meeting was finished and alderman and future mayor Sam McBride stepped out of the room MacGregor shouted “You dirty yellow dog” and chased him back into the empty council chambers. McBride, who was no stranger to fisticuffs himself, had questioned the respectability of MacGregor’s credentials as a music teacher during a council debate. MacGregor got McBride down and started to punch him in the head several times. A doctor later said that MacGregor’s Masonic ring caused the most damage, leaving half a dozen cuts and bruises on McBride’s head and neck. McBride was a member of Queen City L.O.L. 857, and MacGregor was a member of L.O.L.275. Who said municipal politics was dull?

William Adamson

William Adamson was born in Yorkshire, England on January 26, 1821 and came to Canada with his family in 1823. His uncle was Sir Peter Adamson, a Peel County Orangeman. As a teenager he served with the 1st Battalion of Incorporated Militia during the 1837 Upper Canada Rebellion. He owned a wharf at Toronto Harbor and was a successful businessman. Adamson was a Toronto alderman for St David’s ward in 1866, 1868 – 1873 and 1875 – 1885. He was elected a councillor for the same ward in 1864 – 1865. He was initiated into Port Credit L.O.L. No. 163 and transferred into William III L.O.L. No. 140. He was elected as the second county master of Toronto and was to hold the office longer than any other man, serving from 1861 to 1879. William Adamson died on June 2, 1900.

Thomas Allen

Thomas Allen was born in County Armagh, Ireland on May 21, 1831. He emigrated to Canada in 1850 but after two weeks at sea in a violent storm the ship returned to Cork. He worked for his father for another year and left again in 1851 and settled in Toronto. . In Toronto he worked for his cousin Samuel Platt who owned a brewery and in 1868 he joined in a partnership with Hugh Thompson and leased the East End Brewery. He purchased his partners interest in 1875. In 1866 he served as a sergeant with #10 company of the 10th Royals during the Fenian Raids. He was an Orangeman and a Freemason and he founded Enniskillen Purple Star L.O.L. No. 711. He was the Toronto Western District master in 1903. He was a Toronto alderman for St. David’s Ward in 1877 - 1879 and 1883 - 1886 and 1890. Allen was also a member of the Irish Protestant Benevolent Society and he was married twice, first to Margaret Brown in 1857 and she died in 1873. He remarried in 1877 to the daughter of Edward Beckett, an Iron Foundry owner and Temperance leader.

Alexander James Anderson

Alexander James Anderson was born in Middlesex County, Ontario on July 1, 1863. He was called to the bar in 1894 and was awarded a K.C. in 1921. A member of Medcalf L.O.L. No. 781, he was elected to the Toronto city council from 1903 – 1909 and from 1909 – 1913 representing Ward 7. He was elected as a Conservative member of parliament in the riding of Toronto – High Park in 1925, 1926, 1930 and 1935. Anderson served as the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Canada A.F. & A.M. in 1935. Anderson died on June 3, 1946.

Garnet Archibald

Archibald was elected as an alderman for Ward 5 in 1916 and 1917. He ran for a seat on the Toronto board of control in 1918 and was defeated. He was identified as an Orangeman in The Sentinel, December, 1915.

John Armstrong

John Armstrong was born in County Fermanagh, Ireland and came to Canada c. 1825. He was a successful Toronto merchant and served as the master of L.O.L. No. 137 in the 1830’s and he was elected as the Grand Treasurer of the Grand Orange Lodge of Canada. He was elected as a councilman for St. Andrew’s ward in 1834 and 1835, and as an alderman 1837 – 1845 and he was an alderman for St. James’ ward in 1847 – 1848. Armstrong died in August, 1848.

Thomas Armstrong

Thomas Armstrong was the son of John Armstrong and was born in County Fermanagh, Ireland. He came with his family to Toronto c. 1825. He was elected as a councilman for St. Andrew’s Ward in 1848 and 1849 and as an alderman for the same ward in 1852 and 1853. He, like his father, was a member of L.O.L. No. 137.

James Ashfield

James Ashfield was born in Ireland and came to Canada in 1831. During the 1837 Rebellion he was in charge of distributing muskets to government loyalists at Toronto city hall. He was a member of Toronto city council from 1849 – 1853, representing St. George’s ward. He joined the Toronto fire department in 1839 and in 1854 was appointed as the first chief of the department. Ashfield was District Master of Toronto in 1847 when the members voted to celebrate the 12th with a public parade. He stated to the membership that this would be in direct contravention of the Party Processions Act and he resigned as D.M. The Deputy District Master, Richard Dempsey agreed with the members wish to parade and replaced Ashfield as District Master. The parade went off without any problems or repercussions.

John Albert Austin

J. A. Austin was born in Tottenham, Ontario in 1862. He was a druggist in the Parkdale area of Toronto for more than forty years and was elected as an alderman in Ward 6 in 1912. A member of Parkdale L.O.L. No. 207, Austin died on August 11, 1935.

John Bailey

John Bailey was elected as an alderman in St. Stephen’s Ward in 1890. He was a member of L.O.L. No. 843 and served as District Master of Toronto’s Western District.

William Alexander Baird

W. A. Baird was born in Middlesex County, Ontario in 1867. A lawyer, he graduated from Osgoode Hall law school in 1890 and Trinity College, Toronto in 1891. He was the mayor of Toronto Junction in 1907 and helped it amalgamate with Toronto. Baird served on Toronto council in 1910 – 1912 as an alderman from Ward 7. He was elected to the Ontario Legislature in 1926 as a Conservative and held the seat until his death in 1940.

Frederick Margrave Baker

Fred Baker was born on February 3, 1869 and was a successful businessman in several endeavors, before becoming a manufacturing agent. He had served on the town council of East Toronto and he served on Toronto City Council as an alderman for Ward 8, 1919 – 1925. He was a member of Beaches L.O.L. No. 2274 and served as master of the lodge in 1933.

Morgan Baldwin

Morgan Baldwin was born in Toronto on June 26, 1834, one of four brothers, the other three going on to become Anglican ministers. Baldwin was educated at Upper Canada College and following graduation he went to sea for three years before returning to Toronto. In 1855 he married Frances Ross with whom he had three children, two daughters and one son. The son, F. M. Baldwin went on to become an Anglican minister at Aylmer, Ontario. In 1876 he was elected as an alderman for St. Thomas ward and in all sat for five years as a Toronto alderman. In 1880 he was appointed as Harbor Master for the Port of Toronto and held this position until 1896. Morgan Baldwin died at Toronto on March 15,1898.

Herbert Henry Ball

H. H. Ball was born in Bristol, England on September 9, 1863 and emigrated to Canada in 1886. He was a journalist with the ‘Toronto World’ until the paper’s demise in 1921. He sat on Toronto city council 1915 – 1919 as an alderman from Ward 2. In 1926 he was elected to the Ontario Legislature as a Conservative in the riding of Eglinton and served until 1929. He was appointed as King’s Printer in 1930 and held the position until 1934 when Liberal leader, Mitchell Hepburn removed him from his position. Ball was a member of Eglinton L.O.L. No. 269 and died on February 26, 1943.

Edward Warren Barton

Edward Warren Barton was born on May 30, 1846 in Boston, Massachusetts and came to Canada in 1854, settling in Hamilton, Ontario. He moved to Toronto at the age of 8 and later as a young man he founded a successful broom and brush factory. He was elected to the Toronto city council in 1884 – 1888 as an alderman for St. Stephen’s Ward. Barton was a member of Boyne L.O.L. No. 173, he died on September 23, 1918.

Andrew Bates

Andrew Bates was born in Peel County, Ontario in 1849 and moved to Toronto in 1889 where he started a successful undertaking business. A member of Ontario L.O.L. No. 142, he was elected as an alderman for Ward 5, 1894 – 1897.

J. R. Beamish

John Richard Beamish was born in Kent, Ontario in 1868. He was a barber and owned the largest barbershop in Toronto. He was an alderman for Ward 2, 1916 - 1935. He was a member of McKinley L.O.L. No. 275. Beamish died June 1, 1937 and the entire Toronto Council attended his funeral at Cooke's Presbyterian Church.

Joshua George Beard

Joshua Beard was born in England in 1797 and had come to Upper Canada as a young man. He soon started a business and in a short time he became the largest coal merchant in the young town of York. J. G. Beard & Sons was located at the lake at the bottom of Jarvis Street and part of his holdings included a large wharf and grain elevator. Beard took an active role in the life of the town and was for some years the secretary of the town of York. In 1834 when York became the city of Toronto Beard was elected to the very first city council representing St Lawrence Ward, a position that he was to hold for almost twenty years. He was the unanimous choice of council for Mayor in 1854 and he became the tenth mayor in the city’s history. His role as Mayor did not start off well. He became very ill in January, 1854 and was not able to assume his role as Mayor for some time. John Beverley Robinson was appointed to act for him until his health returned.

He returned to the Mayor’s chair in April and for the rest of his term things went quietly, much to the relief of council. One of the major reasons that Beard had been chosen as mayor was his respectability and financial standing. Scandals had plagued the city’s business dealings for years and it was hoped that a man such as Beard would be immune to the temptations of bribery or coercion. This hope proved to be right. Beard did not stand for election to council in 1855 and he now shifted his interest to another area, that of public schools. He had been a member of the Board of Trustees for the public school system in the city since its formation in 1850 and had become Chairman of the Board in 1852 and he was to continue in this office until 1864. He was a strong voice in favour of free education to the public that would be supported by municipal taxes.

When the board was trying to arrange financing for its first public school it had trouble raising the money. Beard co-signed a promissory note for nine thousand pounds and the school was completed. When he retired in 1864 the board had built nine schools and had almost six thousand pupils. Joshua Beard died on November 9, 1866.

Robert Beard

Robert Beard was the brother of Joshua Beard who served as Toronto mayor in 1854. He was elected as an alderman in St. John ward in 1845 - 1849 and in 1851. He served as a councilman in the same ward 1839 - 1844 and 1852. Identified as an Orangeman in Captain Bob and the Noble Ward by Barry Dyster.

Adam Beatty

Adam Beatty was born in County Fermanagh, Ireland in 1810 and came to Canada c. 1838. He started a building contracting business which proved to be very successful. He was elected as a councilman for St. David’s ward in 1851, 1852, 1854, 1855 and 1856. He died on March 30, 1882. He is identified as an Orangeman in “Commemorative and Biographical record of the County of York, 1907.

James Beaty

James Beaty was born in Killashandra, Ireland in 1798 and came to Canada in 1818, settling in the Town of York. He claimed to have carried the Orange flag in the first Toronto Orange Parade in 1822. He was elected as a Reform councillor for St. Lawrence Ward in 1836 and 1846 - 1849 and he was elected as a Conservative member of parliament for the riding of Toronto East in 1867 and 1872. Beaty, who was a member of Eldon L.O.L. No. 136 died on March 5, 1892.

James Beaty

James Beaty was a nephew of James Beaty and was born on November 10, 1831 in Halton County, Ontario. He was called to the bar in 1855 and entered politics as an alderman for St. James Ward in 1877 and he was elected mayor of Toronto in 1879 – 1880. Beaty was elected as a Conservative in the riding of West Toronto in 1881 and 1882. A member of Armstrong L.O.L. No. 137, Beaty died on March 15, 1889.

Robert Bell

Robert Bell was born in Toronto c. 1827, the son of John Bell, who came to Canada from County Fermanagh in 1823. He was elected as a councilor for St. Andrew’s Ward 1860 – 1867 and as an alderman of the same ward from 1867 – 1873. He was elected to the Ontario Legislature as a Conservative for the riding of Toronto West in 1875, 1879 and 1883. Bell was a member of Enniskillen L.O.L. No. 387 and Ontario L.O.L. No. 142 and he died on March 11, 1907.

William L. Bell

William Bell was born at Woolwich, England on September 9, 1836 and came to Canada as a young boy and located at Montreal where he joined the Orange Association at the age of eighteen. He moved to Toronto in the 1860’s and was a successful businessman, owning a coal and wood business that employed over twenty people. He was also a real estate broker and insurance agent. Bell served on Toronto City Council as an alderman representing St. Stephen’s Ward in 1881 – 1884 and from 1888 – 1892. He was also a public school trustee for eight years. He served as the Orange County Master of Toronto from 1889 – 1890.

“William Bell, coal and wood merchant, and real estate agent, 83 Dundas Street, i a native of Woolwich, England, and came to Canada with his parents during the Rebellion in 1837. He served his time to a machinist in Montreal, and for a number of years afterwards travelled in the United States. He finally settled in Toronto, and in 1879 was elected School Trustee for St. Stephen's Ward, a position he held for four years. He was elected Alderman for the same ward in 1881, by a large majority, and continued to represent the constituency until 1883; when he resigned, having been appointed Tax Collector. On the annexation of Brockton to the city (now St. Mark's Ward), he was elected School Trustee, and is still on the Board. His business which has been established now two years is very extensive, especially in the coal and wood department, and his real estate business is greatly on the increase. He is a man highly respected in his vicinity, and the public offices he has and is at present filling is sufficient testimony that he is fully deserving of public confidence.” – The History of Toronto and the County of York – 1885.

Roy Belyea

Roy Belyea owned a successful plumbing business on Merton Street. He first entered Toronto politics, winning a seat representing Ward 9 in 1949. He continued as alderman until he was elected to the Board of Control in 1953. He ran for mayor against Nathan Phillips in 1956 but was defeated. He also lost a comeback bid for the Board of Control in 1958.

James Bennett

James Bennett was a captain in the Queens Own Rifles and served as the District Master of Toronto in 1868. He was a member of Temperance L.O.L No. 301 and was the Grand Master of the Grand Orange Lodge of Ontario West from 1881 – 1884. He sat on Toronto City Council in 1863 and 1864 as a councilman from St. Georges Ward. Bennett worked for the Department of Inland Revenue in Toronto.

J. Wesley Benson

Benson was a Toronto alderman in 1922 and 1923 and 1927 - 1929 for Ward 5. Benson was a member of Ulster Black Watch L.O.L. No. 675, serving as master of the lodge in 1914 and served as the County Master of Toronto in 1926.

Angus Bethune

Angus Bethune was born on September 09, 1783 at Carleton Island, New York and moved with his parents to Upper Canada as a youth. He joined the North West Company of fur traders as a young man and by 1804 he served as a company clerk in Manitoba. He accompanied the expedition of Alexander Henry in 1810 to Rocky Mountain House in present day Alberta and that same year he assisted explorer David Thompson in outfitting his expedition to the west coast.

He became a partner in the North West Company in 1814 and sailed with a cargo of furs to Canton, China. He made another voyage to China in 1816 before the company gave up the idea of using their own ships to transport their cargo. In 1818 and 1819 he was in present day Saskatchewan where he met members of Captain John Franklins’s overland expedition to the Arctic. In 1820 he was a member of a team of North West company members who travelled to England to negotiate an agreement of union with the Hudson Bay Company.

An agreement was reached in 1821 and he was named chief factor in the H.B.C. He retired from active participation in the fur trade in the mid 1820’s but continued to work for the company until 1841. He settled in Toronto sometime around 1840 and became a director of the Bank of Upper Canada. In 1845 he entered municipal politics being elected an alderman for St David’s Ward in Toronto and he was reelected in 1846. Bethune was one of the founders of Enniskillen L.O.L. 387 in Toronto as served as lodge master from 1850-1855. He served as Deputy Grand Master of the Grand Orange Lodge of British America under Grand Master George Benjamin in 1850 and during the split in the Canadian Orange Order in the 1850’s he sided with Benjamin against Ogle Gowan as did his Orange Lodge. He died in Toronto on November 13, 1858 and his son, Dr. Norman Bethune was the executor of his estate which was valued at over $60,000.00

George Birdsall

George Birdsall was a member of L.O.L. 708. He was elected as an alderman in Ward 6, 1918 - 1923. He died in St. Petersburg, Florida, March 9, 1924 at the age of fifty-five.

Clifford Earl Blackburn

Clifford Blackburn was born in Toronto on January 28, 1880. At the age of eighteen he went to work for Timothy Eaton and stayed there for five years. He became a successful building contractor and he served as President of the Liberal Conservative Association of Toronto. Blackburn was elected as an alderman in Ward 5 in 1918 – 1921 and 1924. Identified as an Orangeman in “The Municipality of Toronto, A History Vol. 3”

John Blevins

John Blevins was an attorney and was elected as an alderman for St. David’s Ward, 1874 – 1884. He was the Chairman of the Toronto Board of Health in 1884. He was the Toronto City clerk from 1884 – 1898. Blevins was a member of McKinley L.O.L. No. 275.

Robert Blevins

Robert Blevins was a member of the Grand Committee of the Grand Orange Lodge of British America in the 1830’s. He sat on Toronto’s city council as a councilman from St. Patrick’s Ward in 1837, 1838, 1841 and 1842.

Ernest Charlton Bogart

Ernest Bogart was born in Toronto on October 20, 1896. During World War 1 he was a member of the University of Toronto C.O.T.C. He was called to the bar in 1924 and in 1925 he became the senior partner in ‘Bogart & Kennedy’ law firm, practicing in Toronto. He was the Liberal candidate for the Ontario Legislature in the riding of Bracondale in 1934, but was defeated by Orangeman A. R. Nesbitt. He sat on Toronto city council as an alderman for Ward 5 from 1937 – 1944. He ran for one of the four positions on the Toronto Board of Control in 1945 but finished sixth, just behind the fifth place L. H. Saunders. He was identified as an Orangeman in Who’s Who of Canada – 1936.

Arthur Radcliffe Boswell

Boswell was born in Cobourg on January 3, 1838 and was a lawyer and politician. He served one term as Mayor of Toronto in 1883. Boswell studied law, and became a member of the bar in 1865. He served two terms as chairman of the Public Library Board, and in 1876 he successfully ran for a seat on the Toronto City Council. In 1882 he ran for Mayor; his opponent was John Jacob Withrow, a former Toronto Alderman who was instrumental in bringing Toronto's first industrial fair to fruition (1879). Boswell won the election by 5 votes, and served one term, January 1883 – January 1884.[3] He did not stand for re-election.

In 1911 Boswell was appointed Superintendent of Insurance for Ontario and Registrar of Loan Companies. He died May 16, 1925.

William Henry Boulton

William Henry Boulton was born on April 19, 1812 in York [Toronto], Upper Canada, the son of D’Arcy and Sarah Ann Boulton [nee Robinson, daughter of Sir John Beverley Robinson]. Boulton was born into one of the most prominent families of Upper Canada; his grandfather, D’Arcy Boulton Sr. Was chief justice of Upper Canada and his uncles included John Beverley Robinson. Boulton studied to be a lawyer and was called to the bar of Upper Canada at the age of twenty-three.

Boulton was to become one of the social leaders of early Toronto, his estate "The Grange" being the setting for many of the young city’s most prominent social gatherings. As a member of parliament for Toronto from 1844 to 1853, Boulton supported conservatives William Henry Draper and Henry Sherwood. As a member of one of the old established families he was a strong defender of the privileged position of the Anglican Church with regards to the clergy reserves and education.

Aside from provincial politics Boulton was heavily involved with Toronto affairs. He served as an alderman for St Patrick’s Ward from 1838 until 1842 and after a two year absence from municipal politics he again served as alderman for the same ward from 1844 to 1847. During this time he was elected mayor of Toronto for three successive terms, from 1845 - 1847. After his terms as Mayor Boulton continued to sit on council as an alderman in 1852 and 1858, again being elected Mayor of the city in 1858.

During his term as mayor an agreement had been made between the province and the city over the distribution of judicial powers. The Mayor and aldermen had now ceased to act as magistrates and cases were heard by police magistrates. Boulton got into a fierce argument with the chief constable of Toronto, Samuel Sherwood, and resigned as mayor. He then ran again for Mayor in 1859 in the first election that was held by popular vote, but lost to Adam Wilson.

He then retired from politics and lived at the grange. After his death on February 15, 1874, his wife continued to live there and she later married author Goldwin Smith in 1875. Today "The Grange" is owned by the Art Gallery of Ontario. Boulton had served as the Master of Enniskillen L.O.L. 387 in 1858 and was the Deputy Grand Master of Canada in 1854.

John Bowes

John George Bowes was born in County Monaghan, Ireland in 1812 and came to Canada in 1833. He came to York, Upper Canada, in 1833 and established the largest dry goods store in the city. He was elected as an alderman in St. James’ Ward, 1850 – 1853 and served as mayor of Toronto in 1851 – 1853 and 1861 – 1863. He was elected to the Ontario Legislature in 1854 – 1858 and died on May 20, 1864.

John Boxall

John Boxall was a member of the 10th Royals and was to later become the Commanding Officer of the regiment with the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel. A member of Cavan Black Red L.O.L. 657, he served on Toronto Council as a councilman from St. John Ward in 1859, 1861 – 1863, 1865, 1866 and as an alderman for the same ward, 1867 – 1869.

Ford Brand

Ford Brand was the Secretary of the Toronto and District Labour Council and was a member of Toronto’s Board of Control, 1951 – 1955. He ran for the office of mayor on December1, 1958 but was defeated by Nathan Phillips.

Ernest Bray

Ernest Bray was a member of York L.O.L. No. 375 and was elected as an alderman in Ward 8 1930 to 1940. He ran for a seat on the Board of Control in 1941 but was defeated.

Alonzo Johnson Brown

Technically not a Toronto politician, Brown makes the list because of the area he served being swallowed up by Toronto while he served as mayor. Brown was the owner of Ambrose Kent and Sons, the largest seller of fraternal regalia in the city. He served the town of North Toronto as a councillor for seven years and was mayor for four years. When North Toronto amalgamated with Toronto it was Mayor Brown who handed over the keys of the town to Toronto mayor Hocken, a brother Orangeman.

Albert Burnese

Albert Burnese was born in Collingwood, Ontario on January 23, 1891. A lawyer, he was elected to the Toronto Board of Education in 1924. He was elected as an alderman for Ward 8 in 1929 and 1930. Burnese was a member of Riverdale L.O.L. No. 2097 and Temple R.B.P. 292 and he died in 1976.

Stephen Wellesley Burns

Stephen Wellesley Burns was born in Toronto on July 1, 1866. A lawyer, he was Chairman of the Toronto School Board. Burns was a past master of Brunswick L.O.L. No. 404, serving as lodge master in 1896 and also served as the Financial Secretary of Toronto County Orange Lodge.

Alexander Burnside, M.D.

Alexander Burnside was born in New England, April 9, 1781 and appeared before the Upper Canada Medical Board of Examination in 1820 and was found unfit to practice medicine in Upper Canada. He was licenced to practice medicine in 1822 and set up his practice in Toronto. He sat on Toronto Council as the representative of St. David’s Ward in 1841 – 1844. Burnside was defeated in 1845 by Angus Bethune, finishing his career in municipal politics. A member of Nassau L.O.L. No. 4, he died on December 13, 1854.

William Butt

William Butt served as an alderman for Ward 7 (West Toronto Junction) on Toronto council in 1946, 1947, 1948. He was identified as an Orangeman in the 1946 Report of Proceedings of the Grand Orange Lodge of Ontario West.

J. A. C. Cameron

Cameron was born in Glengarry, Ontario. He graduated in law from Queen’s University in 1894 and served as an alderman for Ward 2 in 1930 – 1931. Cameron was a member of McKinley L.O.L. 275 and died on May 25, 1939.

John Hillyard Cameron

John Hillyard Cameron, the son of Angus Cameron of the 79th Cameron Highlanders, was born at Beaucaire, Languedoc, France, on April 14, 1817 and came to Canada with his parents in 1825. His Scottish heritage was a controlling factor in his character and conduct, and was amusingly recalled by his political foes, who when meeting his Orange supporters at the polling booths would hum to themselves that old Scottish song ‘The March of the Cameron Men.’

During the Upper Canada Rebellion of 1837 militiamen were stationed at Toronto City Hall on the night that the rebels marched against the city. Most of these soldiers were Orangemen and the officer in charge, Lieutenant Colonel James FitzGibbon, sent a young student of Upper Canada College to alarm the city by ringing the bells of Upper Canada College. That young student was John Hillyard Cameron.

Cameron was soon to become a captain in the third regiment of Queen’s Rangers and was later to serve with distinction during the Fenian Raids. In 1846 he was offered the post of Solicitor General in the Upper Canada assembly and a seat was found for him in Cornwall. He was a more than capable politician and while he was Solicitor General, the Premier of Upper Canada, Draper, in a letter to the Governor General spoke of him as a ‘gentleman of great legal eminence, considerable talent, and irreproachable character’. Cameron was a lawyer by profession and of the greatest legal minds in the colony. His intellectual and moral qualities were brought out in startling fashion by the courage which he showed in 1868 when he was not afraid, although an Orangeman and candidate for Parliament, to defend the Fenian, Whelan, who was charged with the assassination of Thomas D’Arcy McGee.

Cameron became an Orangeman in 1857, joining L.O.L. No. 507 in the city of Toronto. He later joined Enniskillen L.O.L. No. 387, also in Toronto of which he remained a member until he died. He represented the riding of Peel from 1861 to 1872 and the northern part of the county, Cardwell, from 1872 until his death in 1876. Cameron was unyielding in his principles and refused to be cowed by party policy and was a threat to John A. Macdonald’s leadership in the Conservative Party. Macdonald recognized this danger to his leadership, for in 1854 he had written to Bishop Strachan: ‘Cameron was useful in legal matters when in the House, but he lacks general intelligence, and is altogether devoid of political reading; so that he was altogether a failure as a statesman. Lord Elgin truly called him a "presumptuous young gentleman". He seeks Parliament again for selfish interests, and I would be sorry to see him represent so powerful a constituency as Toronto". In the world of politics this was what one Orangeman wrote about another one, Macdonald having joined the Orange Order in Kingston in 1841.

On the other hand Macdonald would have liked to have seen another Orangeman elected, George Benjamin, since he was "sure" and would not, because he dared not, break from the party. However, Macdonald did not get his wish and Cameron was elected. When the time came to elect a new Grand Master of Canada in 1859, Orangemen realized that it would have to be someone who was not identified with either of the old sectional interests, either of Benjamin or Gowan, yet he would have had to have achieved distinction elsewhere, probably in politics, to make him acceptable in his high office.

The logical choice, since Macdonald’s political responsibilities ruled him out was Cameron. Cameron made his first appearance at a Grand Lodge meeting in Hamilton on June 21, 1859. The next day, after a lengthy discussion, and by the narrow majority of twelve votes, he was elected Grand Master. From the beginning Ogle Gowan seems to have recognized in Cameron what Orangeism needed and had not had since his own youth - a man who was Orange first and foremost, regardless of any personal affiliations or sectional interests.

Cameron’s sponsorship of the abortive Orange Incorporation Bill of 1856 had already marked him as a champion of Orange ideals. He was a newcomer of obvious intellectual accomplishments and the more thoughtful members of both parties regarded him as a saviour sent to restore peace and harmony in the Canadian Orange Order. He retained the office of Grand Master until succeeded in 1870 by Mackenzie Bowell.

During the elections of 1863, Peel reformers thought that they would defeat Cameron because of his support for the amendments to the Separate School Act. They said that he would no longer receive the support of "Orangemen as a body". Several Peel Orangemen were involved in protests against Cameron’s conduct at this time but their county lodge acted promptly and Grand Lodge minutes of 1863 contain the following paragraph: "The action of the County Lodge of the County of Peel is sustained in the expulsion of the following members for slandering the character of the M.W. the Grand Master, Brother the Honourable J. H. Cameron…."

After five years in office Cameron had intended to retire, but these attacks on his conduct in parliament brought him up fighting. He insisted the state should not ‘coerce the conscience of any man’. "The Roman Catholic declares that it is against his conscience to separate religious from secular education; he says that such is the teaching of his Church, and however erroreous we as Protestants may believe that teaching, his faith is that it is true. He claims that as part of the religious liberty which the civil government has given him that the conscience of his child shall not be subjected to secular teaching only, and he asks that his own rates and taxes only -- not a farthing of any Protestant’s - shall be allowed him for that purpose."

Cameron made his defence before the Grand Lodge at Belleville, Ontario, and it was a tribute to the man that Grand Lodge vindicated his stand, re-electing him by acclamation. Cameron died in 1876, the same year as Ogle Gowan his old friend and mentor, and the deaths of these two great Orangemen left a void that was to prove hard to fill.

Robert Henderson Cameron

R. H. Cameron was born in Aberdeen, Scotland in 1867 and came to Canada in the early 1870’s. He was a Toronto alderman for Ward 4 in 1914, 1915 and 1923 and a member of the Toronto Board of Control in 1916, 1919, 1920 and 1924. He ran for mayor in 1918 and was beaten by a fellow Orangeman, Tommy Church. He was a successful businessman and founded ‘Cameron Manufacturing Co.’, a leather goods firm established in 1905. Cameron was a member of McKinley L.O.L. No. 275.

John Carr

John Carr was born in Ireland in 1813 and came to Canada in 1836. He was elected as a councilman in St. Patrick’s ward in 1847 - 1849 and as an alderman for St. Andrew’s ward in 1851, 1852. He was elected as an alderman for St. Andrew’s ward 1853 – 1855 and 1858. He was elected alderman in St. Patrick’s Ward 1860 – 1864. He was the City of Toronto Clerk 1864 – 1871 and as City Commissioner, 1871 – 1872. Carr served as an alderman for St. Andrew’s ward in 1873. He was appointed as Toronto Harbor Master, 1873 – 1879. He was the Orange District Master of Toronto in 1860 and he died in Toronto in 1881.

Jeremiah Carty

Jeremiah Carty was born in County Cork, Ireland in 1820. He was listed as a soap and candle manufacturer at 131 and 133 Queen Street East in the Toronto business directory of 1865. Carty was a member of Armstrong L.O.L. No. 137 and was a Toronto alderman, representing St. David’s Ward from 1858 – 1860. He died in 1868.

Thomas Langton Church

“Tommy” Church was born in Toronto in 1873. A lawyer, he was called to the bar in 1897. He was a Toronto school trustee 1899 – 1904 and was elected as an alderman from 1905 – 1909. He was elected to the Toronto Board of Control 1910 -1914 and was elected mayor of Toronto 1915 – 1921. He was elected to the House of Commons as a Conservative member of Toronto Broadview in 1921, 1925 and 1926. He was defeated in 1930 and was reelected in 1934 and in 1935. Church was a member of Royal Canadian L.O.L. No. 212 and he died in 1950.

Edward Frederick Clarke

E.F. "Ned" Clarke was born in Bailieboro, County Cavan, Ireland, April 24th, 1850 and came to Canada in the 1860's. He was a printer's apprentice on the 'Toronto Globe' where, in 1872, along with several other Orangemen helped to organize a city wide printers strike, which resulted in his being jailed. In 1875 he founded 'The Orange Sentinel' which became a great success and opened up the world of municipal politics in Toronto to him.

He was a member of McKinley L.O.L. 275, serving as master of the lodge in 1873, and eventually rose to the rank of Deputy Grand Master of the GOL of Canada. In 1888 he ran for election as mayor of Toronto. His opponent was Elias Rogers, a prominent coal merchant in the city. Clarke, who just a few months previously, had been elected a provincial member of parliament for Toronto, organized a brilliant campaign. He used what was to become his traditional power base, the Orange Association, and 'The Sentinel' to his advantage.

He attracted women voters by using women as canvassers and he was the clear choice among labour, recalling his role in the 1872 printers strike. At the height of the campaign the final blow for Rogers came when Nathaniel Clarke Wallace, a fellow Orangeman and M.P., made public the existence of a price-fixing coal cartel in the city which involved Elias Rogers. Clarke was to be mayor for four years before retiring from municipal politics. He was never seriously threatened at the polls.

He continued to sit as a Toronto M.P.P. until 1894 and in 1896 he was elected as a federal member of parliament for the riding of West Toronto, a riding that he was to represent until his death in 1905. On hearing of Clarke's death, the House of Commons adjourned. The funeral, which was held in Toronto, was the largest in the history of the city.

( The following report of the passing of the M.W.D.G.M. of the Grand Orange Lodge of British America appeared in the 1905 annual report of the Grand Orange Lodge of Nova Scotia. ) " On Friday, March the 3rd, the news was flashed over the wires that Bro. E.F. Clarke, Member of Parliament, Editor of the Orange Sentinel, was dead. He passed peacefully away on Friday evening at his home in Toronto. Brother Clarke was indeed an Orangeman, a true friend, a good Protestant, and a loyal citizen of Canada. His name shall be held in reverence as long as the country exists as a good, loyal subject of His Majesty. We, brethren, could ill afford, at this time, to lose such a spirited brother as E.F. Clarke, but as to-day we stand around his Remembrance, let us reverently say: "Not our will, but Thine, O Lord." As an Orangeman he loved the Brotherhood, and did what he could for the Order he loved.

Our dear beloved Brother Clarke
Has left us here to mourn;
No more we'll hear his cheerful voice,
Ah, no, he can't return.
The loss is ours, the gain is his.
Then, why should we despair?
He's gone to meet his blessed Lord,
And praise Him in the air. "

Henry Edward Clarke

The late representative for West Toronto in the Ontario Legislature was a fine example of a self-made and thoroughly upright man - one who in his lifetime earned the confidence and good-will of all who knew him, and in his startlingly sudden death, which occurred on the afternoon of Friday, 25th of March, 1892 while addressing the House, won for his memory the citizen’s coveted medal of honour and affection.

Since 1883, Henry Edward Clarke has been a well-known and prominent member of the local legislature, whose public career in and out of parliament has commended itself, not only to his immediate constituents, but to the community at large, as that of a worthy and useful citizen, a kind and just employer of labour, and an industrious and strictly honourable businessman. So good a life as was his, though shortened by devotion to the public interest, may well be content to reach its close abruptly at the post of duty. For him happily there was no lingering illness, and no premature decay of mental or physical powers.

If not a full ripeness of years, there was ripeness of another sort, the preparedness of a good man to meet his end. When the call came, the late member for West Toronto was speaking to a measure on the floor of the chamber, and though his death was an instant shock to everyone in the House, to the deceased we may be sure, it was as a gentle summons to pass to a higher and better rest.

Henry Edward Clarke was born at Three Rivers, Quebec on the 20th of March, 1829. He was the son of Henry Clarke and Ellen Armstrong, both of whom came from Midhill, County of Fermanagh, Ireland. He received his tuition, which comprised a sound and practical English education, from public teachers and private instructors. When but fifteen years old, he left home to push his fortune in the world. Commerce drew him into its busy and active field. At the age of eighteen he had learned the trade of saddle and trunk making and found employment in one of the largest shops in Montreal.

Here he remained until 1848, when he removed to Ottawa, then Bytown. Steady, reliable and energetic, he became foreman of the largest saddlery shop in the town when barely twenty years of age. At Ottawa he remained for about four years, working diligently, and perfecting himself in his trade. Returning to Montreal in 1853, he was sent to Toronto to open a branch store for R. Dean & Company. Although he had little capital at his command, he had industry and perseverance. Ten months after his arrival here he resolved to carry on business for himself, and buying out the business of Dean & Company, he started out on what has proved a most successful career.

In 1879 he sat in the city council for St. George’s Ward and for St. Andrew’s Ward for the years 1881 - 1883. He was elected in 1883 to represent Toronto West in the Provincial Parliament and was re-elected in 1887 and 1890. Mr Clarke is an Orangeman, having joined the Order in 1849. He belongs to the Methodist denomination and in politics is a Conservative. He married in May, 1856, Anne, daughter of the late Thomas Kennedy of Montreal.

The above biographical sketch was published in 1892.

Tom Clifford

Tom Clifford served for twenty-seven years in total service on the Toronto Board of Education and Toronto City Council. Clifford was the Conservative candidate in the 1978 Canadian election for the riding of Broadview. He lost the election by 420 votes to Bob Rae. Clifford retired from municipal politics in 1991 and he was the last Orangeman to sit on the Toronto City Council. He was a member of Boyne L.O.L. No. 173 and Victory L.O.L. No. 137.

Emerson Coatsworth

Emerson Coatsworth was born in Toronto on March 9, 1854. His father was the City Commissioner of Toronto and he was educated in public schools and graduated from the University of Toronto with an LL.B. in 1886. He was called to the bar of Ontario in 1879 and practiced law with the firm of Rose, Macdonald, Merritt and Coatsworth and he was created a K.C. in 1908. In 1891 he was elected to the House of Commons as the Conservative member for Toronto East and held the seat until 1896. He was a Toronto alderman in 1904 - 1905 and served as mayor of the city from 1906 - 1908. He served as Chairman of the License Commissioning Board of Toronto from 1908 - 1916.

He was appointed as a judge in the County of York in 1914 and served until 1929. He was also the senior police magistrate for Toronto from 1925 - 1934. He attended Berkeley Street United Church for over fifty years and served as their Sunday School Superintendent for fifteen years. Coatsworth was a member of Medcalf L.O.L. 781 in Toronto and served as the chairman of the Alexander Muir Memorial Commemoration Committee. Like many other Toronto Orangemen of the time he had served in the Queens Own Rifles as a young man.

Nelson Merrill Cobbledick

Nelson Cobbledick was born in Biddulph Township, County of Middlesex, Ontario on April 2, 1877. He was the owner of a funeral home at Brantford before moving his business to Toronto in 1905. He was a member of the East Toronto Municipal Council 1905 – 1907 and was a member of L.O.L. No. 215 and York R.B.P. No. 686, and served as County Master of East York in 1918.

William Henry Collings

William Collings sat on Toronto Council as the representative of Ward 8. He was first elected for Ward 8 in 1946 and held it until 1950 when he was defeated in his attempt to win a seat on the Board of Control. He was elected to the Ontario Legislature in 1951 in the Beaches Riding as a Conservative and held the seat until 1961. Identified as an Orangeman in Leslie Saunders memoirs, “An Orangeman in Public Life”.

Frederick Joseph Conboy

Fred Conboy was born on January 1, 1883 in Toronto. After completing high school he graduated from the Royal College of Dental Surgeons in 1904 and opened his own dental practice in west Toronto. He served on the faculty of the dental college and in 1926 he was appointed as director of dental service for Ontario and held the position for ten years. A charter member of Westmoreland United Church he served as a church elder and for over twenty years he was the superintendent of the Sunday School.

He entered Toronto municipal politics in 1909 as a trustee on the Toronto Board of Education and served until 1914. In 1935 he was elected as an alderman for Ward 6. He worked tirelessly on bettering the welfare of Toronto’s working class and his agenda included slum clearance, relief works programmes and public health education. He was elected to the Board of Control in 1936 and was a prime mover of the development of an island airport. He was elected mayor in 1941 with an overwhelming margin of victory of twenty-two thousand votes. The next year he was acclaimed at the polls and remained mayor until 1945 when he was defeated by fellow Orangeman, Robert Saunders. During his term of office he was elected as the president of the Canadian federation of mayors in 1944. Fred Conboy, who was a member of Britannia L.O.L. No. 1388, died at Toronto on March 29, 1949.

John Edward Corcoran

John Corcoran was born in Eugenia Falls, Ontario on July 17, 1890. He was an attorney and was called to the bar in 1917 and in 1928 served as Chairman of The Toronto Board of Education. He sat on Toronto City Council as an alderman from Ward 3 in 1933. Identified as an Orangeman in Canadian Who’s Who – 1936.

John Cowan

John Cowan was an alderman in Ward 4, 1918 - 1922. He was identified as an Orangeman in The Sentinel, January 3, 1918

Edward Strachan Cox

Edward Cox was born in Wellington, Ontario on February 2, 1849. He was a stockbroker and sat on Toronto City Council in 1903, 1904 as an alderman. He was active in the sporting life of Toronto – he organized the city’s first baseball team, was an original member of the Ontario Jockey Club and was President of the Toronto Lacrosse Club. He died on September 4, 1912.

Thomas Crawford

Thomas Crawford was born in County Fermanagh, Ireland on August 14, 1847 and came to Canada in 1865. He started his political career in 1892 when he was elected as an alderman for Ward 5 in Toronto. He was elected to the Ontario Legislature as the Conservative member for Toronto West in 1894 and was to hold it during five elections until the riding was redistributed in 1918. He was elected for the new riding of Toronto Northwest in 1918, 1919, and 1923. Crawford served as the Speaker of the Ontario Legislature from 1907 - 1911 and was a member of Diamond Jubilee L.O.L. No. 913. He was the Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Toronto Western Hospital and was also President of the Irish Protestant Benevolent Association and he was also the President of the Laymens Association of the Toronto Methodist Conference.

George W. Cruise

George Cruise was born in London, Ontario on June 21, 1876. He owned a roofing company and was a member of Enniskillen L.O.L. No. 387. He was elected as an alderman for Toronto’s Ward 8 in 1921.

William C. Davidson

William Cedric Davidson was born in Simcoe County in 1888. A member of L.O.L. No. 2710, he was elected as an alderman from Ward 7 in the 1926 Toronto municipal election. He won again in 1942 and also held the Ward 7 post from 1952 - 1964 when he was defeated and retired from politics. In the 1953 federal election he ran as a Conservative in the riding of High Park but finished second to Liberal Pat Cameron.

William Davis

William Davis, an innkeeper, was one of the hard line Orange members of Toronto council in the 1840’s and 1850’s. He was the City Inspector in 1841 and this put him in charge of hiring for public works and issuing permits for hotels and inns to serve alcohol. Davis played the patronage game to a tee. If you didn’t support the Tory and Orange candidates with a ‘donation’ or campaigning for them then you didn’t get the Innkeeper’s licence or hired by the city. He was finally relieved of this office by W. H. Boulton in 1845. In 1849 he and fellow councilman and Orangeman John Carr were arrested for burning an effigy of Lord Elgin on the street outside of where he was staying during a visit to Toronto. Orangemen were openly hostile to Lord Elgin because of his role in the passing of the Rebellion Losses Bill. Both men were released after three days because no jury in Toronto would convict an Orangeman for insulting Elgin. Davis was a councilman for St. David’s riding 1847 – 1850 and 1853. He also represented St Lawrence Ward in 1856 – 1857.

Henry Mowat Davy

Henry Davy was born in Odessa, Ontario in 1884 and moved to Toronto when he was sixteen. He worked as a salesman for T. Eaton Company and in 1911 he started his own real estate and insurance business. He was an alderman for Ward 7 in 1921 and 1922. A past master of L.O.L. No. 2710, Davy died in 1950.

Ralph Day

Ralph Day was born in Toronto on November 24, 1896. He quit school when he was seventeen to enlist with the 169th Battalion. Transferred to the 116th Battalion he achieved the rank of sergeant and served in France. After working for his father’s sign company he began working for a Toronto undertaker in 1921 and in 1929 bought his own funeral home. He first entered Toronto municipal politics in 1927, being elected as a school trustee in Ward One.

He was elected as an alderman for Ward 1 in 1934 and was reelected in 1935 and 1937. He was a member of the Toronto Board of Control and was elected as mayor of Toronto in 1938 and 1939 before retiring from politics the following year. He was appointed as the first chairman of the Toronto Parking Authority in 1953 and held the position until 1962. He became the chairman of the Toronto Transit Commission in 1963 and retired from the position in 1972. Ralph Day died in May of 1976.

Richard Dempsey

Richard Dempsey was born in 1825. A member of Brunswick L.O.L. No. 404, Dempsey was the Deputy District Master of Toronto (Note – Toronto would not become a separate county until 1860) in 1847. At a District meeting the members passed a motion to parade on the 12th of July in direct contravention of the Party Processions Act. The District Master, James Ashfield, tried to convince the members to withdraw their motion and when they refused to back down, he resigned his office. Richard Dempsey took over the office of District Master and agreed with the members on the issue of a parade. As a result of this, Dempsey led the membership on parade on July 12 and there was no trouble.

Dempsey, who was a lawyer, was Orange to the core and was married on July 12, 1853 by Reverend V. P. Mayerhoffer of Eniskillen L.O.L. 387. He held the office of Deputy Grand Master of the Grand Orange Lodge of British America (Canada), 1856 – 1857. Like many other Toronto Orangemen he was active in local politics, being elected as an alderman for St. David’s ward, 1849 – 1852 and for St. John’s Ward, 1855 – 1857. Dempsey died in Toronto a relatively young man on April 10, 1862.

William Dennison

Bill Dennison was born in Westmeath Township, Renfrew County, Ontario on January 20, 1905. He started working life as a real estate agent but in 1930 he started a Speech Therapy School in Toronto and operated it until 1965. Dennison had a severe stuttering problem in his youth and it prompted him to help others with speech defects. His first successful try at municipal politics came in 1937 when he was elected as a trustee on the Board of Education in Ward Two and held the position until 1940. He was elected as alderman for Ward Two in 1941 and was defeated in 1942 and was again elected in 1943.

In 1944 he was elected as the provincial member of parliament in St. David’s riding for the C.C.F. Party, which was to later become the New Democratic Party. He held the seat until 1952 when he reentered municipal politics as an alderman for Ward 2 and held the office until 1958. He was a member of Toronto’s Board of Control from 1959 – 1966. Dennison was elected as mayor of Toronto in 1966 and held the office until 1972. His daughter Lorna Milne was appointed to the Canadian Senate as a Liberal in 1995. Bill Dennison was a member of Enniskillen L.O.L. No. 387 and he died on May 2, 1981.

Frank Denton

Frank Denton was elected to Toronto City Council representing Ward 3 in 1924. Denton was a member of William III L.O.L. No. 140. His daughter Laura Denton was called to the bar in 1920 . Laura Denton (later Mrs. George Duff) was a co-founder of the Women's Law Association and organized its first meeting in 1919 in the law office of her father, with whom she worked. She and her brother, Frank, carried on her father's practice after his death, at least until 1923. For many years, she was elected to the Senate of Victoria College, University of Toronto. Source: Law Society of Upper Canada Archives, Women's Law Association of Ontario fonds.

Rob Dibble

Rob Dibble was born in 1891 in Toronto, Ontario. Prior to World War 1 he served for three years with the Queens Own Rifles and was serving with the 9th Battery, Canadian Field Artillery at the time of his enlistment in 1915. He joined the 34th Battery, C.F.A. in Kingston, Ontario in 1915 and joined the 180th Battalion as a lieutenant in April, 1916. He served overseas with the 38th Battalion and was wounded on January 28, 1917. He rejoined the 38th in August, 1917 and was wounded on August 21, 1917. Dibble’s main interest was in rowing and at the age of twenty he was the amateur single sculling champion of Canada. He would later become the president of the Don Rowing Club of Toronto. He was an alderman for Ward 8, 1924 – 1928. Dibble was a member of McKinley L.O.L. No. 275.

Nathaniel Dickey

Dickey was born in Belfast, Ireland in 1829 and came to Canada in 1847. A member of L.O.L. No. 301, he represented St. Patrick's Ward as an alderman 1862 - 1867 and 1868 - 1870.

John Dill

John Dill was born in Little York (Toronto) in 1833. His father, Alexander Dill had come to Toronto from Northern Ireland in 1827. He served a six year apprenticeship as a house painter and then started his own business. He was elected to the city of Toronto council as the representative from St. Patrick's Ward in 1876 - 1878. Identified as an Orangeman in "History of Toronto and County of York, Ontario Volume 2".

Alexander Dixon

Alexander Dixon was born in Dublin, Ireland in 1792 and came to Canada in 1830. He was elected as a councilor for St. Lawrence Ward in 1835 and as an alderman from the same ward 1837, 1838,1840 – 1844. His occupations were ironmonger, saddler and hardware merchant. Dixon was a member of L.O.L. No. 137 and he died in 1855.

Thomas Downey jr.

Thomas Downey was born at Richmond Hill, Ontario, February 12, 1843. He was initiated into the Orange Order in 1865. He was a past master of L.O.L. No. 396. Downey was elected as an alderman for St. John’s ward in 1882 and 1883. Identified as an Orangeman in ‘Cyclopedia of Canadian Biography, 1886.

Thomas Downey sr.

Thomas Downey was born in Ireland and emigrated to Toronto in 1842. He was a carpenter and formed a successful building contractor business. A member of L.O.L. No. 396, he was elected as an alderman for St. John’s Ward, 1873 – 1876. Downey died in Toronto in1879.

William Duckworth

William Duckworth was born on October 25, 1884 in Garafraxa Township, Dufferin County, Ontario. He owned a wholesale produce business and sat on Toronto Council representing Ward 5 from 1931 – 1934. He was a member of the Ontario Legislature, representing the riding of Dovercourt as a Conservative member from 1934 – 1948. William Duckworth died on November 8, 1951. He was identified as an Orangeman in ‘An Orangeman in Public Life’- the memoirs of L. H. Saunders.

George Duggan

George Duggan was born in Ireland in 1783 and came to the town of York in 1807. He was a cabinet maker and helped to train the York Militia. He fought in the War of 1812 and was present at the Battle of York. He was appointed as Coroner and magistrate of the town. He was an alderman in St. Lawrence ward in 1834 and as an alderman in St. David’s ward in 1835. He was the uncle of George Duggan who defeated Robert Baldwin for an assembly seat in 1842.

George Duggan

George Duggan was born in County Cork, Ireland in 1812. He was called to the bar of Upper Canada in 1837 and opened his law practice in Toronto. He served on the Toronto city council from 1838 to 1840 as an alderman for St. David’s ward and from 1843 to 1850. In 1841, he was elected to the 1st Parliament of the Province of Canada in the second riding of York and was reelected in 1844. He served as the District Master of Toronto and in 1849 he was elected as the Junior Deputy Grand Master of Canada. He was appointed as a judge in the York County court in 1868. He died in Toronto in 1876. He left the Order after being appointed a Toronto police commissioner in 1859 and he was one of the strongest opponents of allowing Orangemen to join the Toronto police force.

Goldwin Corlett Elgie

Goldwin Elgie was born at Dresden, Ontario on July 21, 1895. He graduated from the University of Western Ontario with a B.A. in 1917 and after further study at Osgoode Hall he was called before the Ontario bar in 1920 and was created a K.C. in 1934. He served as Grand Master of the Orange Young Britons and was a member of Maple Leaf L.O.L. No. 455 and Dian L.O.L. No. 2054. He got his start in municipal politics being elected as alderman for Toronto’s Ward 8 from 1931 – 1934, heading the polls each time. In 1934 he was elected to the Ontario Legislature representing the riding of Toronto – Woodbine as a Conservative. He was to represent this riding until 1948. Goldwin Elgie died on April 4, 1975.

Thomas William Elliott

Tom Elliott was born in York Township in 1840 and moved to Toronto in 1867. He was a coal and feed merchant and was elected to Toronto Council in 1884 – 1886 for St. Matthew’s Ward. Identified as an Orangeman in the “History of Toronto and County of York.”

George M. Evans-Lewis

George Evans was born in Three Rivers, Quebec on February 1, 1828. He was educated at Upper Canada College and the University of Toronto. In 1850 he was appointed the Headmaster of the Simcoe Grammar School and kept the post until 1856 when he left to teach at Upper Canada College from 1856 – 1860. He then studied law and was called to the bar in 1864. He was elected as an alderman in St. Patrick’s ward, 1879 – 1883.

William H. Fenwick

William Fenwick was born in Grey County, Ontario and came to Toronto in 1888. He was elected as an alderman in Ward 1 in 1917 – 1918. He was a member of Cumberland L.O.L. No. 621. The following obituary was printed in the January 21, 1936 edition of the Mail and Empire. "William H. Fenwick, 501 Logan Avenue, president of the Fenwick Cartage and Storage Company, died at Toronto East General Hospital yesterday, after five weeks illness, in his 67th year. Born in Flesherton, Ontario he had resided in Toronto for more than 50 years, always in the Riverdale district, where he was widely known. He was a former alderman for Ward One, a member of Orient Lodge, A.F. & A.M., the I.O.O.F., Cumberland L.O.L., of St John's Presbyterian Church and was active in Toronto’s Ward One Conservative Association."

Thomas Foster

Thomas Foster was born July 24, 1852, in Lambton Mills, Ontario. He began his working life working for a butcher until he saved fifty dollars and used that to open his own shop. The money that the store earned was all funneled into real estate, eventually making him a wealthy man. He was first elected as an alderman for St. David’s Ward in 1891 and 1892 and 1894. He lost in 1895 and avoided politics until 1900 when he was returned as an alderman and held the office until 1910 and again from 1912 – 1917.

He was elected to the House of Commons in 1917 as a Union Government candidate in the riding of East York and served until 1921. He returned to municipal politics and served the next three years on Toronto Council. He was elected as mayor in 1925 and held the office until 1927. He was known to Torontonians as "Honest Tom" because as mayor of Toronto he reportedly saved the city two million dollars by keeping a tight rein on needless expenditures.

He died at the age of 93 on December 10, 1945 and left $500,000 for cancer research, $100,000 for an annual picnic to be held at Exhibition Park for school children, and funds to feed wild birds in Toronto. Foster also sponsored a contest to reward mothers for their skills at procreation. The prizes were $1,250 for first, $800 for second, and $450 for third. Four ten-years periods began and ended on his death date, and ran from 1945-55, 1948-58, 1951-61, and 1954-64. Foster was a member of McKinley L.O.L. No. 275 and R.B.P. 292.

William W. Fox

William W. Fox was a member of Temperance L.O.L. No. 301 and sat on the Toronto Municipal council as a councillor for St. James Ward in 1857 and 1858 and as an alderman in 1859 and 1860. He attended the G.O.L. of Canada meeting in London in 1858 and was listed as a member of the Grand Committee.

Dr. William Stewart Fraleigh

William Fraleigh was born in Picton, Ontario in 1845. A medical doctor, he moved to Toronto in the 1870’s to practice his trade. He was active in municipal politics and served as an alderman for Ward 5. Fraleigh was a member of McLeod L.O.L. No. 821 and died on August 19, 1904 at Toronto.

Arthur Frost

Arthur Frost was born in Toronto on May 16, 1888. He was a Toronto alderman for seven years and was elected to the Ontario Legislature as the Conservative member for Toronto – Bracondale, 1951 – 1959. Identified as an Orangeman in “Canadian Parliamentary Guide.”

Frederick Goldwin Gardiner, Q.C.

Fred Gardiner was born in Toronto on January 21, 1895. An attorney, he was called to the bar of Ontario in `1920. During World War One he served overseas as a member of the Canadian Mounted Rifles and the Royal Flying Corps. He served as reeve of the village of Forest Hill from 1938 – 1949 and was the Warden of York County in 1946. In 1953 he was appointed as the first Chairman of Metropolitan Toronto by Ontario Premier Leslie Frost and he held the position until 1961. While holding the office of Metro Chairman he was the prime mover behind the building of the Gardiner Expressway and the Don Valley Parkway. “Big Daddy”, as he was called ran the Metro Council like a business and was the most successful Chairman in the history of Toronto. Fred Gardiner was a member of Ulster L.O.L. No. 864 and he died on August 22, 1983.

George Reginald Geary, O.B.E.

Reg Geary was born in Strathroy, Ontario on August 12, 1874. A lawyer, he was called to the bar of Ontario in 1896. He was elected as a Toronto alderman from 1904 – 1908 and in 1910 he defeated fellow Orangeman, H. Hocken for the Mayor’s office, and held the position until 1912. He served with the Canadian Expeditionary Force in World War One and served with the 35th and 58th Battalions. He was awarded the Military Cross in 1916 and the Croix de Guerre in 1917. Following the war he returned to Toronto politics and in 1925 he was elected to the House of Commons as the Conservative member for Toronto South Riding. He was reelected in 1926 and 1930 and that year he was appointed as the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada by R.B. Bennett, Prime Minister of Canada. He was defeated in 1935. A lifelong interest in the military he was the Commanding Officer of the Royal Grenadiers from 1923 – 1926 and held the rank of colonel. Reg Geary was a member of Cameron L.O.L. No. 613 and he died in Toronto on April 30, 1954.

Harry Glendinning

Dr. Harry Glendinning was born in Vallentyne, Ontario in 1879 and graduated from Trinity Medical College in Toronto in 1905. He served on the Toronto Public Library Board for ten years and was President of the Conservative Association of Ward 2. He served on Toronto Council as an alderman for Ward 2 in 1942 - 1944. A member of Enniskillen L.O.L. No. 387, Glendinning died on April 11, 1948.

Henry Godson

Henry Godson was a member of William III L.O.L. No. 140 and served on Toronto city council as alderman for St. Andrew’s Ward 1860 – 1862 and 1865 and 1872. As the chairman of the Toronto Board of Works he supervised the building of Toronto’s Orange arch in 1860 for the visit of the Prince of Wales.

James Good

James Good was born in Ireland c. 1816 and came to Toronto in 1832. In 1840 he bought the ‘Union Furnace Company’ and built ‘The Toronto’, the first locomotive built in Canada West. He seemed to go from one financial disaster to another, however he had the backing of his father in law, Bartholomew Bull, a wealthy man. He was elected as a councilman in St. James riding in 1854 and as an alderman for the same riding in 1855. Good died suddenly of a heart attack on September 12, 1889.

James Gormley

James Gormley was born in County Tyrone on April 30, 1820 and was a schoolteacher at Strabane for five years. He came to Canada in 1847 and settled in Toronto. He founded the Ontario Loan & Investment Co. He sat on Toronto Council in 1885 as an alderman for St. James Ward. Identified as an Orangeman in “Toronto Board of Trade Souvenir” – 1893.

Ogle Gowan

Ogle Robert Gowan was born at Mount Nebo, County Wexford, Ireland on July 13, 1803, the son of John Hunter Gowan and Francis Anne Turner. His godfather was Colonel George Ogle, Grand Master of the Grand Orange Lodge of Ireland at that time. Gowan became an Orangeman at the young age of fifteen when he was initiated in County Wicklow. In the 1820’s he published "The Antidote", a small political newspaper in Dublin in partnership with George Perkins Bull. The paper folded when Bull was jailed for slandering a Roman Catholic priest. The parting was a bitter one and Bull and Gowan were to have a running feud both in Ireland and Canada until Bull’s death in the 1850’s. In 1825 Gowan wrote and published his first tract on Orangeism entitled, "The Annals and Defence of the Loyal Orange Institution in Ireland." That year saw the dissolution of the Grand Lodge of Ireland at the urging of the British government and Gowan quickly became the assistant Grand Secretary of the Benevolent and Loyal Orange Institution of Ireland and it was his association with this organization that was to cause so much controversy for him in later years.

Gowan emigrated to Canada in 1829 with his family and settled at Escott Park, Leeds County, Upper Canada. He had knowledge through his Orange connections in Ireland of the numerous isolated Orange Lodges in Canada and soon after his arrival in Canada put that knowledge to use. Many Canadian Orangemen had long sought a central organization to give the Orange Association in Canada some political power. They realized that without a central governing authority that the Orange Lodges would remain ignored by the power brokers in Upper Canada.

Gowan now set about to do just that. He called a meeting of most of the Orange Lodges in Upper and Lower Canada to be held in the Brockville courthouse on January 1, 1830. The result of this meeting was the formation of the Grand Orange Lodge of British America, with Gowan being elected as Deputy Grand Master, the Grand Master’s position being reserved for the Duke of Cumberland. The Duke never assumed the title and for all intents and purposes Gowan filled the office from Canadian Orangeism’s official beginning as a Grand Lodge.

He first ran for politics in the Upper Canada election of 1830 in which he lost running as an independent. Gowan had angered many Orangemen and Tories by refusing to be the running mate of any of the local members of the Family Compact. To promote his political interests after his defeat he founded the "Brockville Sentinel" in 1830 which lasted just a few years. He also bought the "Brockville Gazette" and ran it for a short time before selling the paper to fellow Orangeman Arthur McClean.

Gowan feuded with the local Family Compact families, the Jones’ and Sherwoods who tended to look down their noses and Gowan and his Orangemen. Gowan didn’t care for his political base was the working class immigrant Irish Protestants who had been shut out of a voice in the Upper Canada Legislature. He was elected for Leeds County in both 1834 and 1835 but both elections were declared invalid because of allegations of violence and intimidation at the polls by his supporters. He was elected in the general election of 1836 which was called by the Lieutenant Governor Sir Francis Bond Head and that same year he founded the "Brockville Statesman".

During the Upper Canada Rebellion of 1837 Gowan raised a volunteer company of militia, composed of Orangemen and named them the ‘Brockville Invincibles’. He was given a commission as a captain in the 2nd Regiment of Leeds militia and commanded a company of the Queens Own Rifles which he led during the capture of Hickory Island. He was commissioned a lieutenant-colonel and led his militia battalion at the Battle of the Windmill where he was wounded twice. Following the battle his battalion was given the title of ‘Queen’s Royal Borderers’ in recognition of their service.

During 1836 the news that the Orange Order in Ireland had dissolved and Governor Head stated that he hoped that Canadian Orange Lodges would follow their example. Pressure was put on Gowan but he refused to bend and the Canadian Grand Lodge continued uninterrupted. In 1839 Gowan wrote a pamphlet on responsible government and the government responded by removing him as an agent of crown lands in the Johnstown District. That same year in the Upper Canada Legislature he introduced a bill to divide the clergy reserves among all legally recognized denominations. There was tremendous opposition to both of these proposals from with the ranks of Canadian Orangemen.

During the Baldwin-LaFontaine Reform government of 1841 Gowan was stripped of his government appointments and lost his bid for re-election. He was elected again in 1844 and this time won great admiration for his skill as a parliamentarian and a debater. LaFontaine, who was no friend or admirer of Gowan, stated that "Gowan is the most accomplished speaker in the House."

During this time Gowan became a friend and confidante of John A. Macdonald who had joined the Orange Association in 1841 in Kingston, Ontario. It was Gowan’s influence that made Premier William Henry Draper offer Macdonald the post of Attorney General. Macdonald realized his debt to Gowan and wrote that : "We cannot expect to obtain his (Gowan) services and refuse the reward and highly as I appreciate his powers of benefiting us, I confess I fear his means of doing mischief more."

Gowan stepped down as Grand Master in 1846 and was succeeded by George Benjamin. He moved to Toronto in 1852 and bought the "Toronto Patriot" and was elected as a Toronto alderman in 1853 and 1854. In 1853 he challenged Benjamin’s leadership at the Kingston Grand Lodge sessions and set in motion a terrible division in Canadian Orange ranks. Gowan and Benjamin both set up rival Grand Lodges and for two years the split continued. Most Orange Lodges supported Gowan with just over one hundred of them in the Benjamin camp. The Benjamin Grand Lodge rehashed the charges against Gowan that were laid by George Perkins Bull over whether or not Gowan had ever been an Orangeman in Ireland. The split was healed in 1856 with Gowan stepping down and Benjamin also refusing to stand which left George Lyttleton Allen as the new Canadian Grand Master.

Gowan was re-elected to Parliament in 1858 following two defeats in the riding of Ontario North when he was victorious in North Leeds. He retired from politics in 1861 after serving twenty-seven years in the Legislature and on his retirement he was called "the father of the House". Gowan was the prime mover of the Imperial Grand Orange Council Meetings and had suggested as early as 1855 to the Earl of Enniskillen that there would be a great benefit for Orangeism if meetings were held at which Orangemen from all parts of the Empire were invited. He was Canada West’s first official delegate at the first meeting held in Belfast in 1867.

In 1859 Gowan published his most ambitious work on Orangeism. That year he published three volumes entitled "Orangeism, its origins and history". The fourth volume which dealt with Canadian Orangeism was never published and the manuscript was lost. Gowan had sent it to Mackenzie Bowell for proofreading and to make sure that there were no errors in it regarding the Canadian Orange schism during 1853 - 1855. It was apparently never returned and has never turned up.

Gowan, who had been the founder first lodge master of L.O.L. No. 1, Brockville, had transferred his membership to L.O.L. 137 when he moved to Toronto. Until his death on August 21, 1876 he continued to attend Grand Lodge meetings and was a mover of countless motions at them. He opposed the setting up of provincial grand lodges and continued to fight the idea for several years after it had become an accomplished fact in 1860.

John James Graham

John James Graham was identified as an Orangeman in the Report of Proceedings of the Imperial Grand Orange Council which met in Toronto in 1906. He was the alderman for Ward 6 (Brockton and Parkdale). He was defeated in 1910 and it is interesting to note that there were five Orangemen running for Ward 6 that year.

Robert H. Graham

R. H. Graham was a Toronto alderman for Ward 5 in 1891, 1892, 1895, 1896, and 1898, 1899. He was a member of Gideons Chosen Few L.O.L. No. 342 and Ulster Black Watch L.O.L. No. 675.

George Gurnett

George Gurnett was born in 1792 in Sussex, England and emigrated to the United States sometime around 1820. In 1826 he came to Upper Canada and settled in Ancaster where he began a newspaper "The Gore Gazette" the following year. It was a pro Family Compact paper and set the tone for Gurnett’s lifelong support of the Tory government and the people who ran it.

Gurnett moved to York in 1829 and started another paper "The Courier of Upper Canada" and once again used it to support the actions of the government and to condemn Reformers. His constant attacks against prominent Reformers brought on the wrath of William Lyon Mackenzie who attacked him time and again in his newspaper, "The Colonial Advocate". Both men spent much time slandering each other and both were extremists for their own causes.

Gurnett spent a total of seventeen years on Toronto city council. He was Mayor on four different occasions; 1837, 1848, 1849, and 1850. It was during his first term of office that Gurnett really made his mark on the city. As mayor he was also a Home District magistrate and clerk of the peace. He was one of Mackenzie’s most vocal opponents and unlike the Governor, who refused to listen until almost too late, Gurnett believed that the rebels would attempt to attack the city. Gurnett swore in approximately a thousand men for the city’s defence and by doing so may well have saved the city.

He later served for three consecutive years and they were also to be eventful. Toronto had its first great fire which burned down the centre of town and destroyed St James Cathedral. Gurnett was always a strong promoter of the city and never missed a chance to make it a better place to live. He resigned from Toronto city council at the end of his term of mayor for 1850 and was appointed as the first police magistrate of Toronto. He served in this office until he died on November 17, 1861. Gurnett was one of the men who had shaped and formed the city in its formative years and despite his partisanship on behalf of the Family Compact in his early days he always worked for the good of his city.

A. E. Hacker

Albert Edward Hacker was born in Port Hope, Ontario on June 7, 1868 and was a printer and publisher. He was the president of Toronto’s Ward 4 Liberal Association and was the Liberal Party organizer for the city of Toronto. He was elected to Toronto City council as an alderman from Ward 5 in 1921 – 1923 and he was elected to the Toronto Board of Control in 1924 – 1929. He ran for the mayoralty of Toronto, but finished a distant third in 1930. He was reelected to the Board of Control in 1931 but was defeated in 1932. Hacker was a member of William III L.O.L. No. 140.

Edward Hales

Hales was a Councillor for St. James Ward in 1858 – 1859. He was a member of Queen City L.O.L. No. 857.

John Hallam

John Hallam was born in England in 1833 and came to Canada in 1856. He ran a successful leather goods business and he was elected as an alderman for St. Lawrence ward for eleven years between 1872 and 1883. He was the most vocal voice on Toronto Council to establish a free library system for Toronto. He was elected as an alderman in 1899 and ran for mayor in 1900 but was defeated and he died later that year.

William J. Hambly

William Hambly was born in Toronto in 1845. He started his working life as a printer’s devil at the ‘Toronto Globe’. He was later the president of the Canada Savings and Loan Building Association that developed housing in the Beaches area of east Toronto. One of the streets that was developed was named Hambly Street and Hambly lived at number 62. He was a Toronto public school trustee and sat on Toronto Council as an alderman representing Ward 2 in 1910. Hambly died on November 26, 1939.

Frederick John Hamilton

Fred Hamilton was born in Port Credit, Ontario on July 14, 1869. He was the commanding officer of the 126th Battalion, C.E.F. during World War 1. He was elected six times as alderman from Ward 5 and was a member of the Toronto Board of Control 1940 – 1944. He was a member of Port Credit L.O.L. No. 163 and Cameron L.O.L. No. 613. Hamilton died January 20, 1949.

Samuel Bickerton Harman

Harman was born in Brompton, London, England, December 20, After graduating from King's College School in London, he became a clerk with the Colonial Bank at its Barbados branch in 1840, and in 1843 became accountant and later manager of its Grenada branch. He returned to England in 1847 and moved to Upper Canada the following year in order to tend to some investments of his wife's family. By the early 1850s, he was reading law, and was called to the bar in 1855. He would serve as a bencher of the Law Society of Upper Canada from 1869 to 1871. Harman was a member of the first synod of the Anglican Diocese of Toronto in 1853, eventually being appointed as its treasurer and then as its registrar. He served on the executive of the Saint George's Society, eventually becoming its president in 1860. An Orangeman, he was also a master freemason from 1842, and was instrumental in introducing the Knights Templar into Toronto in 1854 (in which he would act as a senior officer until 1882). When the Institute of Accountants and Adjusters of Ontario failed to secure an Act of incorporation from the Legislative Assembly of Ontario, Harman was named as its president. His political skills and stage-managing of the Toronto business élite enabled its incorporation as the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Ontario in 1883. He was elected as an alderman for St Andrew’s Ward 1866–1868, 1871–1872 and was mayor 1869 – 1870. Harman also served as assessment commissioner 1872–1874 and city treasurer 1874–1888. He died March 26, 1892.

William Spencer Harrison

William Harrison was born at Milton, Ontario, August 10, 1864. He graduated from Trinity College, University of Toronto as an M.D. in 1885. He was a member of the Toronto Board of Control in 1907, 1908, and 1909. He was a member of the Board of Governors of Toronto General Hospital and was the director of the House of Industry which was operated by the Canadian Order of Woodmen of the World, of which Harrison was the chief executive officer. Harrison was the Liberal candidate in the riding of Halton in the Federal election of 1908, however he lost to fellow Orangeman, David Henderson, the Conservative candidate by a vote count of 2417 - 2205. One of his sons was a pilot in the Royal Flying Corps during W.W. 1 and had twelve confirmed "kills", giving him the title of Ace. An Orangeman, he held membership in Gideon’s Chosen Few, L.O.L. No. 342, Toronto. Harrison died on September 12, 1930.

John Hewitt

John Hewitt was born in County Limerick, Ireland on December 10, 1843 and came to Canada with his family in 1847. He was a cooper by trade and he worked in New York for three years in the 1860’s and became a committed labour unionist. In 1866 he saw active service during the Fenian Raids.

He organized local # 3 of the Coopers International Union of North America and in 1870 he was appointed as Canadian organizer of the union. In 1871 he was elected as the first President of the Toronto Trades Assembly. He was a founding member and driving force in the creation of the Canadian Labour Union in 1873 and served as its first secretary.

In politics he was a strong Conservative and he was one of the trade unionists in the late nineteenth century who worked to keep the working class vote in the Conservative fold. In 1873 he accepted a job as a clerk in Toronto’s Waterworks department and he resigned from the Toronto Trades Assembly the following year.

A member of Royal Canadian L.O.L. 212, Hewitt was co-editor and co-owner of "The Sentinel" from 1877 - 1879. He served as County Master of Toronto in 1898 - 1899 and as Grand Secretary of the Grand Orange Lodge of Ontario West from 1906 - 1911. At the turn of the century Hewitt was quoted "the progress of the labour movement can have but one result, namely justice and equal rights to all men". He served on Toronto Council as an alderman in 1908. John Hewitt died on March 14, 1911.

Norman Gladstone Heyd

Norman Heyd was born in Toronto in 1881. He sat on Toronto Council as an alderman from Ward 3, 1910 – 1912. A graduate of Osgoode Hall law school, his law practice was in Toronto and he was a member of McKinley L.O.L. No. 275. Much of his time and energy went into the growth of the Moose Lodge of which he was the Supreme Grand Master of Canada. Heyd died in Toronto in 1962.

Zephaniah Hilton

Zephaniah Hilton was elected as an alderman for Ward 1, 1909 - 1912. He was identified as an Orangeman in the Toronto Star's coverage of the 1933 Toronto Orange Parade. He was a member of Riverdale L.O.L. No. 2097.

W. W. Hiltz

William Wesley Hiltz was born in Georgetown, Ontario in 1874. He would serve as mayor of Toronto in 1924 and previously he had been the Chairman of the Toronto Board of Education. Prior to entering politics he had been a high school teacher, building contractor and real estate developer. He owned so much property in Toronto that he was the second highest taxpayer in the city behind Timothy Eaton. Hiltz was a member of Gideons Chosen Few L.O.L. No. 342 and R.B.P. No. 292 and was the superintendent of Danforth Methodist Church where he was in charge of the largest Methodist Sunday school in Canada. Hiltz died in 1936.

Throngs Pay Tribute To Ex-Mayor Hiltz

Funeral Service in Danforth United Church Attended by Many.

A tribute to the career of public service of the late W. W. Hiltz, ex-mayor of Toronto, was recorded in the large attendance at his funeral service held this afternoon in Danforth United Church, where the deceased had been superintendent of the Sunday school for a quarter of a century. Four of his predecessors assisted the minister, Rev. Gordon Sisco. Mayor McBride, members of city council, members of the board of governors and staff of the Toronto East General hospital, and representatives of numerous other organizations helped to swell the crowd that filled the church.

Rev. J.J. Coulter of Sarnia, associated at Danforth with the late Mr. Hiltz for 16 years, paid tribute to his sterling qualities. His achievements as a teacher, business man, public figure and faithful servant of the church were traced by Mr. Sisco. Dr. R.J.B. Simpson, Rev. C.W. Watch and Rev. G. E. Large were the other assistants. Interment took place at Mt. Pleasant cemetery. The pallbearers were two brothers of the late Mr. Hiltz, George and Herbert, John Brick, W. Wiggins, T. E. Richardson, and R. G. Elliott.

Horatio Clarence Hocken

H. C. Hocken was born in Toronto in 1857. At an early age he acquired the nickname “Race” and he was to be called by that name by his friends for the rest of his life. Hocken was a committed trade unionist and as a teenager he worked as a typesetter at the Toronto Globe and was instrumental in leading a strike against that paper. He was later to be a part of a group that formed a new Toronto newspaper, “The Toronto Star” and after leaving the Star he worked as a reporter at the Toronto News and later became its city editor. In 1905 he purchased “The Orange Sentinel” and became its editor. At that time The Sentinel was a large circulation weekly newspaper and as its editor Hocken rose to prominence in the Orange Association.

He served on the Toronto board of control from 1907 - 1911 and in 1912 he was elected mayor of Toronto. It was during his term as mayor that Hocken was to show his social concern for the poor of the city. Speaking of the high unemployment in the city during his first term as mayor he said, “After we spend all the money we have to spend, after we find all the work that it is possible to find, we feel absolutely helpless in dealing with the problem as we find it today.”

During his two terms as mayor of the city many reforms were made. Parks were opened up to the use of the public, for as he said, “the parks are for walking in, not for athletic sports.” Playgrounds with supervised recreation were added to the park system because he felt “it takes a boy who has been playing in the alleyways and puts him into the hands of a young man or young woman who has a good outlook on life....teaches him....how to play and, inspires him with the club idea.”

Public health measures included the establishment of public baths, installation of a sewage treatment plant and a filtration plant, and extension of the sewer system, a public health nursing programme and the distribution of fresh milk to infants in the slums. In the first eight months of 1910 Toronto’s death rate from communicable diseases had been 114 per 100,000. By Hocken’s second term as mayor in 1914, that death rate was reduced to 27 per 100,000. A housing company was formed to build houses for rent at cost. To combat the “meat trust” the city purchased and operated an abattoir and a cold storage plant “to keep all the small wholesale butchers in business, and prevent the great meat trust....from driving out the small dealer.

Hocken was later to serve as the Conservative member of parliament for the riding of West Toronto from 1917 - 1930, retiring undefeated. He was appointed to the Canadian Senate on December 30, 1933. In the Orange Association he was a member of Lansdowne L.O.L. No. 469 and Queen City L.O.L. No. 857. He served as the Grand Master of the Grand Orange Lodge of Ontario West in 1917 - 1918 and as Grand Master of Canada from 1918 - 1922. Hocken died on February 18, 1937 - less than 48 hours after the death of his wife - and left behind him a long and lasting legacy of social reform. He was an enigma to those who thought of all Orangemen as right-wing, anti-reform dinosaurs. It really wasn’t that strange. Hocken was uncompromising in his principles, whether speaking as an Orangeman or as a social reformer.

William Hodgson

William Hodgson was born in Toronto in 1844. He worked as a market gardener until he was twenty-two when he became a carpenter for fifteen years. He later became president of two companies, “Acme Loan Company” and “Dominion School Supply Co.” He sat on the Toronto School board for nine years, serving one year as Chairman. He was a member of Toronto City Council and was a member of L.O.L. No. 111, serving as lodge master in 1891. Hodgson was Deputy County Master of Toronto in 1901.

Thomas Henry Holdsworth

T. H. Holdsworth was born in Hamilton, Ontario on May 25, 1885. During World War 1 he served overseas with the 2nd and 83rd Battalions, C.E.F. He was a retail fur merchant and was President of the Ward 5 Conservative Association. He was elected to the Toronto city council in 1931 – 1933 as an alderman for Ward 5. Holdsworth was a member of Imperial L.O.L. No. 2767 and R.B.P. 337.

Richard Honeyford

Honeyford was an alderman for Ward 1, 1918 - 1921. He was identified as an Orangeman in The Sentinel, January 3, 1918.

Walter Howell

Walter Howell was a member of John Ross Robertson L.O.L. No. 2971 and was elected to Toronto Council as an alderman from Ward 8 most years between 1930 and 1947 before finally being defeated in 1948.

William Holmes Howland

W. H. Howland was born on June 11, 1844 and was mayor of Toronto1866 – 1867. He had been elected President of the Toronto Board of Trade in 1874 – 1875. He was involved in many causes like the Toronto General Hospital, the Toronto Bible Training School, the Christian Missionary Union, the Mimico Industrial School for Boys and he was interested in improving the living conditions of the slum areas of the city.

He turned to municipal politics to try to help the city with problems like drunkenness, slum conditions, filthy streets and to clean up the foul water supply. Howland campaigned for morality, religion and reform with the support of the Municipal Reform Association and is elected by a margin of 1900 votes. His campaign coined the motto "Toronto the Good" for the city.

During Howland's first term he had much controversy. He was removed as mayor after personal finance problems made him transfer his assets to his wife. After that he didn't have the property qualifications to be mayor. Another election was called and he went back to the nomination meeting after he had transferred his assets back to himself. There were no other candidates so he was again confirmed as mayor. Many problems arose when he came back as Mayor. Senior officials were arrested for misuse of funds after a coal-supply scandal broke out and a street railway strike that was backed by Howland had the militia brought in after three days of rioting. His attempt to restrict liquor licences was also defeated by council.

During his second term, council's time was occupied with projects like the Don Improvement Scheme, construction of a new city hall and court house (to replace both old city hall and Adelaide Street Court House), waterworks improvements and street paving. He was finally able to have the number of liquor licences issued by council reduced after the passing of the "Fleming Bylaw".

He didn't seek re-election and left politics. He spent the rest of his life trying to sort out his personal business affairs that suffered during his mayoralty. He died December 12, 1893.

William Peyton Hubbard

William Peyton Hubbard was born in Toronto in 1842. His parents had been slaves in the United States before escaping to Canada, using the Underground Railroad. He was first elected to the Toronto Municipal Council in 1894 having been elected as an alderman for Ward 4. He was elected to the Toronto Board of Control in 1904 and was re-elected until his defeat at the polls in1908. He retired from politics in 1915, having been the first black to be elected at the municipal, provincial or federal level in any city in Canada. Hubbard died in 1935 at the age of ninety-three. He was an Orangeman, being a member of William III L.O.L. No. 140.

Harry Hunt

Henry William Hunt was born in Hamilton, Ontario on September 14, 1884. He was the President of Hunts Limited, a baking and confectionary business. He served as an alderman in Ward 3 in 1922 and 1924 – 1934. He ran for mayor in 1935 and 1936 and was defeated by Jimmy Simpson in 1935 and by Sam McBride in 1936, both of them Orangemen. Hunt was a member of McKinley L.O.L. No. 275.

John Hutchison

John Hutchison was born in Port Patrick, Wigtonshire, Scotland in 1817 and came to Canada with his parents in 1828. He moved to Toronto in 1847 and started a business as a merchant. He was successful and soon became a director of the Toronto and Sarnia Railroad and of the Metropolitan Gas and Water Company. He was first elected to the Toronto city council as an alderman for St. James’s Ward in 1853 and he was one of the Toronto aldermen who resigned their position in response to the council’s failure to censure the mayor, John Bowes, over his implication in fraud and scandal.

He was returned to city council in 1856 and was elected chairman of the finance committee of Toronto. He tried several times to have the council reduce local taxes without success but this issue marked him as a spokesman for the working man. In 1857 he was chosen by council as Mayor of the city by a one vote margin. That year Toronto was hit by its worst recession in its short history and one of the victims of the recession was John Hutchison, and on November 2, 1857 he wrote the following letter to city council: “In consequence of the temporary derangement of the affairs of my firm, I feel it due to the Citizens of Toronto and to myself that I should resign my office as Mayor of the City and I will thank you to communicate my resignation to the Council this evening”. He was persuaded by council members to remain in office until the end of this term and the following year he moved to Montreal. Hutchison died July 7, 1863 at Metis, Quebec.

John Innes, M.B.E.

John Innes was born in Scotland and came to Canada c. 1900. He sat for eight years as a member of Toronto Council and from 1947 – 1951 he was a member of the Board of Control. Innes was a member of Eglinton L.O.L. No. 269, and he died in July, 1951.

John Irwin

John Irwin was born in Leitrim, Ireland in 1824 and sailed for New York in 1850, where he stayed for a year before coming to Canada in 1851. After a short stay in Toronto he moved to Quebec for four years before finally settling in Toronto. For fifteen years he was proprietor of the General Wolfe Hotel, on the corner of Church and King Streets, and was also engaged in farming eight years, ten miles out of the city. He was the first man to hitch a horse to a steam fire engine, having had a contract to furnish the horses for the fire-engines for eighteen years. Irwin sat on the Toronto city council for eight years between 1880 and 1890 as the alderman for St. John’s Ward. He was a large property owner. John Irwin was a member of York L.O.L. 375 and served as lodge master for several years.

Frank Marsden Johnson

Johnson was elected as an alderman in Ward 1, 1918 - 1922. He was identified as an Orangeman in The Sentinel, January 3, 1918.

Follis Johnston

Follis Johnston was born in Leitrim County, Ireland and came to Canada in 1863. He owned a grocery store at the northeast corner of Queen and Bathurst Streets. He was a member and served as the first master of Lansdowne L.O.L. No. 469. This lodge was quickly given the name of “the lawyers lodge” because of the number of members of the legal profession that held membership in the lodge. In 1876 the Roman Catholics of Toronto had made plans to have a Jubilee Parade and it proved to be well attended. The parade was attacked by a mob of citizens who time and again were held back by the police escort. Several demonstrators were indicted as rioters and faced stiff fines and jail sentences if convicted. Johnston had several prominent citizens testify to his good character, including Robert Bell, M.P.P. and one of the foremost Orangemen in the city and Dr. James Allen, who was a member of R.B.P. No. 292. The charges against Johnston were dropped and he walked out of court a free man. His fellow rioters were not so lucky – apparently they didn’t have the Orange connections that Johnston had. Follis Johnston went on to have a successful career in Toronto municipal politics, being elected to the Toronto Public School board for seven years, and serving as Chairman in 1884. He was also elected to Toronto city council for four terms, 1885-1888. Johnston died on May 9, 1905.

Francis William Johnston

Frank Johnston was born in York County, Ontario in 1862 and in 1883 he opened a grocery business on Davenport Road. He sat on Toronto City Council as an alderman for Ward 3 in 1918 – 1921. He was a member of Cameron L.O.L. No. 613 and R.B.P. No. 292.

John Jones

John Jones was born in Glamorganshire, Wales, in 1843 and came to Canada in 1850. Like many other Toronto Orangemen, Jones took a great interest in municipal politics and was elected to city council as an alderman for St. Matthews Ward from 1884 – 1888. He was a member of Leslieville L.O.L. No. 215 and served as lodge master for seven years.

S. Alfred Jones

Alfred Jones was elected to Toronto’s first Board of Control in 1906. He was a member of Lansdowne L.O.L. No. 469.

Albert James Keeler

A. J. Keeler was elected as an alderman for Ward 5 in 1909. He was an attorney and a member of L.O.L. No. 779.

Warring Kennedy

Warring Kennedy was born in County Down, Ireland, in 1827. He attended grammar school in Londonderry before becoming an apprentice in the dry goods business in Kilrea, later moving to Belfast. Kennedy emigrated to Toronto in 1857 where he went to work for J. Macdonald and Company, where he worked his way up the corporate ladder very quickly. In 1869 he entered into a partnership in a new wholesale business which was called Samson, Kennedy and Gemmel. This business was an immediate success and made Kennedy a very wealthy man.

Kennedy was involved with many associations within the city: member of the Toronto Board of Trade, President of the Irish Protestant Benevolent Society, Treasurer of the Upper Canada Bible Society, and President of the Commercial Travellers Association. He was a member of Temperance L.O.L. 301 in Toronto and as secretary of the Toronto Methodist Conference he was a delegate to the Ecumenical Council in Washington, D.C. in 1890. Before he was nominated for mayor in 1894, Kennedy had held only one publicly elected office, alderman for St John's Ward in 1871. He had ran for mayor against Angus Morrison in 1877 but had been defeated. In 1894 he was the personal choice of a Toronto political giant and fellow Orangeman, E.F. Clarke. In the election Kennedy easily defeated Fleming to take the mayor's chair. In 1895 he stood for re-election against Fleming and this time he defeated Fleming by the narrow margin of just fourteen votes.

The year 1895 was to be a disastrous one for Kennedy. There was a severe economic recession and his company was forced into receivership, with all of its stock being bought by the T. Eaton Company. Virtually bankrupt, Kennedy retired from public life following the collapse of his business. He died in June, 1904 and the City Council noted that he had been one of the foremost and progressive businessmen of the City.

John Kerr

John Kerr was born in Carney Hill, County Tyrone, Ireland in 1819 and came to Canada in 1840. He owned a bakery business and was a member of Toronto Council, representing St. Patrick’s Ward in 1872. Kerr was a member of Enniskillen L.O.L No. 387 and he died on July 12, 1896. Identified as an Orangeman in ‘Commemorative and Biographical Record of York’.

Allan Lamport

Allan Austin Lamport was born in Toronto on April 4, 1903. He was educated at Upper Canada College and went into the real estate and insurance business and joined the Royal Canadian Air Force at the outbreak of World War Two as a Squadron Leader. His entry into municipal politics was in 1937 when he was elected as an alderman in Toronto’s Ward Two. He was also elected as the Liberal member for St. David’s Riding in 1937 and held the seat until 1943 when he was defeated at the polls and he returned to Toronto municipal politics where he was an alderman in Ward Three for three years.

He was elected as a member of the Toronto Board of Control in 1949 and 1950 and ran for the mayor’s position in 1951 but was defeated. He was elected mayor in 1952 and was reelected in 1953 and 1954. In June of 1954 he resigned as mayor and became a Toronto Transit Commissioner and served as chairman of the T.T.C. from 1956 -1958. In 1969 he was again elected as an alderman in Ward Two. He retired from politics in 1972 and died on November 18. 1999. Allan Lamport was a member of "Ulster Black Watch" L.O.L. No. 675 and “Belfast Purple Star” L.O.L. No. 875 of Toronto.

John Laxton

John Laxton was born in Huntingdonshire, England on November 5, 1848 and moved to Toronto in 1871. He was a building contractor and served on the Toronto Board of Education. He was the President of the Conservative Association in St. Alban’s Riding. Laxton was elected as an alderman in Ward 6, 1924 – 1931. Identified as an Orangeman in “The Canadian Album” – 1892.

Robert Leslie

Bob Leslie was born in Scotland and founded Canada Cartage in 1914 and would remain the president of the company until 1946. During the depression he opened a food and clothing depot for unemployed men. He was an alderman for Ward 5 and ran for mayor in 1934 and 1935. Leslie was a member of Imperial L.O.L. No. 2767.

John F. Loudon

John Loudon was a Toronto alderman in 1903 and sat on the Board of Control in 1904. He was a member of Medcalf L.O.L. No. 781and a past master of Northern Star L.O.L. No. 778, having served as lodge master in 1891. Loudon served as District Master of Toronto’s Centre District and was the Commodore of the Queen City Yacht Club from 1900 - 1903.

Robert Luxton

Luxton was born in Somerset, England, March 12, 1882. He enlisted in the 204th Battalion, C.E.F. and spent two years in France and was awarded the Military Cross. He was a successful building contractor and was elected as an alderman for Ward 1, 1922 – 1926, and 1928. He was chairman of the Toronto Works Committee in 1924 and was a director of the C.N.E. in 1923 and 1925. Luxton was a member of Queen City L.O.L. No. 857.

Ian McLean Macdonell

Ian Macdonell was born in Toronto on August 8, 1895 and served overseas during World War One as a lieutenant with the 41st Battery, Canadian Field Artillery. He was called to the bar in May, 1920 and set up his law practice in Toronto and served as an alderman on city council in 1926 and 1927. He joined the Queens Own Rifles in 1920 and was given the rank of lieutenant colonel in 1936 and was Commanding Officer of the regiment in 1939. He was appointed as a judge of the County Court of York in 1933 and was appointed as a judge of the Surrogate Court of York in 1949. He wrote several books covering the field of law, his last one being “Criminal Appeals” in 1989. Macdonell was a member of Victory L.O.L. No. 137 and served as the County Master of the Loyal Orange County Lodge of Toronto in 1932. Ian Macdonell died in Toronto in 1992.

Donald Chadwick MacGregor

Don MacGregor was born in Guelph, Ontario on November 8, 1877. He was a concert baritone and made several tours throughout Canada and the United States. He was also a prolific writer of songs and music composer. He sat on Toronto Council for eighteen years as an alderman representing Ward 6 and he served on the Toronto Board of Control in 1924 and 1925. MacGregor was a member of McKinley L.O.L. No. 275.

Charles Alfred Maguire

Charles Maguire was born in Toronto on May 14, 1875. In his entry into municipal politics he was elected as an alderman from 1909 – 1917, representing Ward 3. He was a member of the Toronto Board of Control from 1917 – 1921. He served two terms as the mayor of Toronto, 1922 – 1923. He was a member of McKinley L.O.L. No. 275 and a member of R.B.P. 292.

Thomas Mara

Thomas Mara was born in County Leitrim in 1808 and came to Canada in 1832. He operated a shoe store on King Street West for ten years then switched to being a real estate developer for thirty-five years. He served in the Upper Canada Rebellion and was a member of Toronto city council, representing St. Patrick’s Ward in 1854 and 1855. Mara was a member of L.O.L. No. 10.

Frances Maxwell

Frank Maxwell sat on Toronto Council as a member for Ward 8 in 1920, 1922 and 1923. He was a member of Dian L.O.L. No. 2054.

Joseph May

Joseph May was elected as an Alderman for Ward 5 1910 – 1913. He was a member of Toronto True Blue L.O.L. No. 551.

Samuel McBride

Sam McBride was born on July 13, 1866 and left school at the age of thirteen to work as a newsboy for the Toronto Leader newspaper. He tried several different jobs over the next two decades before becoming alderman for Ward 3 in 1905 and held the position until 1916. He served on the Toronto Board of Control in 1918 and 1919 and served as alderman for Ward 4 in 1924 – 1925. He was elected as the mayor of Toronto in 1928 and held the office for two years. He again sat on the Board of Control from 1932 -1935 and served as mayor once again in 1936 and died while in office in November of the year. Sam McBride was a member of Queen City L.O.L. No. 857.

Frederick George McBrien

Fred McBrien was born in Dufferin County, Ontario on June 15, 1888. He moved to Toronto as a teenager and was the alderman for Ward 6 in 1911 -1913, 1916 – 1918, and 1923. He served as an alderman in Ward 3 in 1919 – 1920. He was an attorney and in 1923 he was elected to the Ontario Legislature as the Conservative member for the riding of Southwest Toronto. Re alignment of riding boundaries led to him being elected as a provincial Tory M.P.P. for the riding of Brockton-Toronto in 1926 and he held the riding until 1934. He also served as the Conservative member for the riding of Parkdale in 1937 – 1938. McBrien was a member of Excelsior L.O.L. No. 2018 and Dovercourt L.O.L. No. 804.

William Carson McBrien

William Carson McBrien was born in Orangeville, Ontario, January 12, 1889. Along with his brother he ran a successful hardware business in Toronto. During World War 1 he served in the Canadian army, holding the rank of major in the 12th Battalion, Canadian Railway Troops. He was the chairman of the Toronto Transit Commission 1932 – 1933 and from 1933 to 1954. McBrien died June 18, 1954.

Hiram McCallum

Hiram McCallum was born in Caledon East, Peel County on August 14, 1899 and moved to Toronto with his family in 1901. After completing high school he started working life as a clerk with the Farmer’s Sun newspaper and he eventually became the business manager of the paper. In 1931 he started his own business, McCallum Press, a printing firm. He was elected as an alderman for Ward Eight in 1941 – 1943 and was a member of the Toronto Board of Control from 1943 – 1948. He was elected as Toronto’s mayor in 1948 and held the position until 1951. He sat on Toronto’s Planning Board from 1953 – 1963. Hiram McCallum died on January 13, 1989.

Jesse Overn McCarthy

Jesse McCarthy was born in Walpole Township, Haldimand County, Ontario on November 10, 1867. He was elected as an alderman for Ward 6 in 1910, 1911 and sat on the Toronto Board of Control – 1912, 1913, 1914. He ran for mayor in 1915, being beaten by fellow Orangeman T. L. Church. McCarthy was a member of Parkdale L.O.L. No. 207.

James Henry McGhie

James McGhie was born in Peel County, Ontario and was an alderman for Ward 6 in 1908 – 1909. He ran for the Board of Control in 1910 but lost. He was a lawyer and was the solicitor for the Ontario railway Board. McGhie was a member of Parkdale L.O.L. No. 207.

John McMillan

John McMillan was a member of Royal Canadian L.O.L. No. 212 and Toronto L.O.L. No. 328. He was the County Master of Toronto and was the Grand Master of the G.O.L. of Ontario West, 1902 – 1904. He sat on Toronto Council as an alderman for St. James Ward 1885 – 1889.

John McMulkin

John McMulkin served as an alderman for Ward 4 in 1918 and 1919. Identified as an Orangeman in the Sentinel, December, 1917.

William Barclay McMurrich

McMurrich was born in Toronto, November 1, 1842 and was a lawyer and politician. Murrich was educated at Knox Academy and Upper Canada College. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1863 and a Master of Arts degree in 1864 from the University of Toronto. He then studied law and was called to the Bar in 1866. He was a practicing lawyer.

In 1868, he was elected a public school trustee for the St. Andrew's ward and served in this position for eight years. In 1879, he was elected to the Toronto City Council for the St. Patrick's ward. In 1881, he was elected mayor of Toronto and re-elected in 1882. He did not run in 1883 instead was a candidate for the Canadian House of Commons in the riding of West Toronto in the 1882 federal election. He lost to James Beaty, Jr. He died in February 9, 1939 and was buried in Mount Pleasant Cemetery.

F. H. Medcalf

Francis Henry Medcalf was born on May 10, 1803 at Delgany, County Wicklow, Ireland. He came to Canada as a boy, remaining there until the age of twenty-one. At this time he moved to the United States where he lived until 1839, during which time he married before returning to Toronto. He was a pioneer of the foundry and machine business, one of the first of that line in Toronto, and he established his first foundry on Queen Street East between Yonge and Victoria Streets. He also built one at the Don River, known as the Don Foundry and Machine Shops. This foundry built threshing machines, steam engines, grist and sawmills. Later he purchased another on King Street.

His home was close to his business - a large house at King and Queen Streets in the east end of the city. Prominent in the financial world of Toronto, he was also a member of city council and served as alderman for St. Lawrence Ward in 1860, St. David’s in 1863, 1867, and 1868. On January 06, 1864 he was elected mayor of Toronto. He later represented St. John’s Ward in 1870 and 1871 and was re-elected mayor in 1874 and 1875. During his term of office he represented the city as mayor at the Lord Mayor’s banquet held in Guildhall, London, England on July 29, 1875.

A staunch Conservative, he was an active member of the Church of England. He was for a time the master of Loyal Orange Lodge No. 275 and in 1860 he became the first County Master of the newly created County Orange Lodge of Toronto. He later served as the Grand Master of the Grand Orange Lodge of Ontario West from 1862 - 1864, the second person to hold that office.

Two of his sons, Alfred and Edward, were also Orangemen and Edward served on a gunboat on Lake Erie during the Fenian Raids under Captain McMaster. During the same raids Mayor Medcalf served with the Canadian troops at the Battle of Lime Ridge.

Medcalf died on March 26, 1880 at the age of seventy-seven in Toronto. The following is a newspaper account from George Brown’s “Globe”: “His lodge service took him into the mayoral election of January, 1864. The Separate School controversy was at its height in 1863, and a coalition of Liberals, Orangemen and Tories brought him forward to oppose Mayor John Bowes, a defender of Separate Schools.”

Harold Menzies

Harold Menzies was born in Toronto in 1902. He was a real estate broker and first entered politics in 1932 as a member for Ward 5 on the Toronto Board of Education. He was reelected in 1933 and 1938 – 1942, 1948 – 1951, 1954, 1955. He was elected as an alderman in Ward 5, 1956 – 1969. He finished his political career as a Toronto Board of Education trustee for Ward 3, 1976 – 1982. Menzies died in 1989.

Gordon James Millen

Gordon Millen was born in Toronto on February 19, 1899 and was living at home on Pape Avenue when World War 1 broke out. When he enlisted in the Canadian Army on June 22, 1917 he listed his occupation as a Dental student and he was assigned to the Canadian Army Dental Corps. After the war he opened his dental practice on Danforth Avenue. He ran for Toronto Council in 1932 but was defeated. He finally won a seat on council in 1937 representing Ward 1. He left municipal politics in 1945, having won the Conservative nomination for the riding of Riverdale, narrowly defeating Leslie Saunders. Millen went on to win the election and took his seat in the Ontario Legislature. He didn’t finish his term of office, dying suddenly on April 10, 1948. Millen was a member of Riverdale L.O.L. No. 2097.

Benjamin Miller

Miller sat on Toronto Council as an alderman from Ward 5 1924 – 1927. He was a member of Ulster Black Watch L.O.L. No. 675.

Wallace Millichamp

Wallace Millichamp was born in Birmingham, England on May 27, 1839, and came to Canada in 1856. He started up a silver and gold plating business in 1864 which became a huge success and he was a member of the Toronto Board of Trade and the Dominion Manufacturers Association. He was elected to Toronto city council as an alderman for St. James’ Ward in 1883, 1884 and 1887. Millichamp was a member of McKinley L.O.L. No. 275 and he died on August 28, 1917 at his home on Poplar Plains Road.

Robert Moodie

Robert Moodie was born in Ireland in 1828 and came to Canada as a boy with his parents. As a nine year old he was a cook’s mate on the steamer “The Cobourg” at the Battle of the Windmill. He was in Toronto by the late 1840’s and owned and operated a tavern as well as being the skipper of the excursion steamer, “The Firefly” and because of this he was known as Captain Bob throughout his life. It was his role in Toronto politics that he is remembered, for he became perhaps the most powerful political broker in the city during the 1850’s and early 1860’s. His personal political fiefdom was St. John’s Ward which extended from Yonge Street to College Avenue and from Queen Street to Bloor Street. St. John’s Ward was overwhelmingly Protestant and Orange and Moodie, a member of Temperance L.O.L. No. 301, controlled the votes. He served as an alderman for the ward from 1855 to 1865 and never failed to bring out the vote for his fellow Orangemen and on occasion to defeat them, urging the voters of the ward to get out and “vote like Protestants”. Moodie never allowed himself to be tied to any party and though he usually supported the Tories, in 1857 it was two Orangemen who moved and seconded George Brown’s nomination for Parliament, John Holland and Robert Moodie. Moodie was one of the most interesting characters to ever grace Toronto politics and he died in Toronto at the young age of thirty seven in 1865.

George Monro

George Monro was born in Scotland in 1801 and came to Upper Canada with his family the very next year. He was apprenticed to store owner John Young at the age of thirteen and while not yet twenty years of age he became a partner in the business. He later formed a company on King Street in Toronto with his brother before going his own way in 1824 and he soon became one of the wealthiest men in the town. He took an active role in York[Toronto] society. He was active in the Bible Society, and was a director in several companies including the Home District Savings Bank. In 1833 he became a magistrate for the town of York and in 1834 he was elected to the very first Toronto city council as an alderman for St Lawrence Ward.

He was chosen as mayor for 1841 by his fellow council members, narrowly beating out George Gurnett. He had hardly stepped into his office when it was announced that Kingston had been chosen as the capital of Canada. This was disastrous news for Toronto and land values took a nose dive. Monro sent a letter protesting the decision and making a case that the capital should alternate on an annual basis between Quebec City and Toronto. After the shock had died away Toronto continued to grow and improve during Monro’s term of office. Gas lighting for the city’s streets was begun that year and there was a proposal to build a waterworks to treat the city’s drinking water. While serving his term as Mayor he stood as a candidate for one of the seats in the Toronto riding for the newly created legislature of the United Canadas.

He ran as a Tory with his running mate being Henry Sherwood. He came in dead last among the four candidates and the Reform Party won both seats. When the election results were announced there was rioting throughout the city and at least one man was killed. He again tried for a seat in the Legislature in 1844 this time in the east riding of York. He was defeated but his opponent was unseated after a protest by Monro and Monro sat in the legislature until 1845. He lost yet again in 1848 and this time he retired from politics. The defeat was particularly embarassing to him as his opponent, William Blake, was in Europe while the election was held and yet he managed to win. Monro also retired from business life in 1857 and retired to his home at Front and George Streets which after his death on January 5, 1878 became The Black Horse Inn.

Angus Morrison

Morrison was born in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1822 and came to Upper Canada with his father in 1830. Morrison joined the law office of his older brother, Joseph, as a clerk in 1839, was called to the bar in 1845 and opened his own practice in Toronto. He was elected to city council in 1853 and 1854. He was elected to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada in the North riding of Simcoe in 1854; he was reelected in 1857 and 1861. He was elected in an 1864 by-election to represent Niagara. He was elected to represent Niagara in the federal parliament in 1867, serving until his defeat in the 1874 general election. During his time in office as mayor 1876 - 1878 Morrison helped promote the development of transportation links within the province. In 1873, he was named Queen's Counsel. During his time as mayor, he helped establish the Credit Valley Railway and negotiated an agreement with Ottawa to have the city take over the exhibition grounds. He died in Toronto in June 10, 1882.

William Vincent Muir

Wm. Muir was born in Essa Township, Ontario in 1884. He was elected as a alderman in Ward 6 from 1939 – 1943. Muir was a member of Reverend George Walker L.O.L. No. 791 and served as the County Master of Toronto in 1935.

William Murdoch

William Murdoch represented Ward 1 (Riverdale) on Toronto council in 1946 and 1947. He was identified as an Orangeman in the 1946 Report of Proceedings of the Grand Orange Lodge of Ontario West.

A. R. Nesbitt

Russell Nesbitt was born in Durham County, Ontario on November 01, 1884. He was admitted to the Ontario bar in 1910 and began his law practice in Toronto. He served as a Toronto alderman from 1916 to 1921 and as Toronto controller in 1922. He was a member of McKinley Loyal Orange Lodge No. 275 and R.B.P. No. 342. He also held membership in the Loyal True Blue Association and the Apprentice Boys of Derry and he served as County Master of Toronto in 1931. Nesbitt was returned as the Conservative member for Toronto Bracondale in the Ontario Legislature. He was successful in four consecutive elections, 1923, 1926, 1929, and 1934. Russell Nesbit died in July, 1962 and he was given an Orange funeral service.

"One of the best known Orangemen in Toronto, A.R. Nesbitt, Q.C., aged 79, passed away on the eve of July 12th. For over 50 years, Russell Nesbitt was a prominent figure in every Toronto parade and a regular attender at his own McKinley Lodge. On five different occasions Brother Nesbitt was Worshipful Master of his Lodge and served as County Master of Toronto in 1931.

Born in Blackstock, Durham County, Ontario, he attended Trinity College and graduated from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1910 and had his law practice in Toronto. Active in community and public life he served on the Toronto City Council and was a former M.L.A. for Bracondale. At all times, Brother Nesbitt gave his Orange principles priority. He was a member of the Loyal True Blue Association and took a special interest in the Home at Richmond Hill where his Lodge, L.O.L. 275 arranged annually that the children be in the Toronto parade. He was also a member of R.B.P. 342, Ulster Lodge S.D.O.I., Coronation A.F. - A.M. and the Apprentice Boys of Derry.

An Orange funeral service was held at the Cook Funeral Home with McKinley L.O.L. No. 275 in charge and representatives of Grand Lodge, Provincial Grand Lodge and the County of Toronto in attendance. The funeral was from St. Paul's Anglican Church where Brother Nesbitt was a respected member. Interment in St. John's Anglican Cemetery where Brother Reverend Canon H.E. Ashmore, Past Grand Master, officiated."

Source: Sentinel, July - August, 1962

John Noble

John Noble was born in Orangeville, Ontario on March 7, 1854, the son of Irish born parents. He taught school for several years until 1880 when he moved to Toronto and attended the Toronto School of Medicine from which he graduated with an M.B. and he then received his M.D. from Victoria College at Cobourg, Ontario. He opened his medical practice on Carleton Street in Toronto in 1890. He was a member of the Toronto Board of Education for seventeen years, and was Chairman of the Board in 1920. He also represented Ward Two as an alderman on city council for four years, 1905 – 1908. Noble was a member of William III L. O. L. No. 140 and died on September 6, 1927.

Joseph Oliver

Joseph Oliver was born in Erin, Ontario on November 7, 1852. He was the president of Oliver Lumber Company and was a Toronto alderman in 1895, 1901 – 1902 and a member of the Board of Control in 1903 - 1904. He served as mayor of Toronto in 1908 – 1909. Oliver was a member of McKinley L.O.L. No. 275 and he served as master of the lodge in 1903. He died on January 8, 1922.

Joseph Orlando Orr, M.D.

Doctor Joseph Orr was born in York County, Ontario on April 8, 1854. He graduated from the University of Toronto as an M.D. and he set up his medical practice at Toronto where he practiced for twenty years. In 1893 he retired from medicine to become the manager of the Canadian National Exhibition, a position he was to hold until his death. Interested in municipal politics, he was elected as an alderman for Ward 6 in 1890 and held the position for four years. Orr was a member of Royal Canadian L.O.L. 212 and had previously been a member of L.O.L. No. 884 of which he served as master of the lodge in 1891. Joseph Orr died in 1917.

James Pepler

James Pepler was born in Bristol, England, February 24, 1827 and came to Canada in 1868. He was elected as an alderman representing St. Patrick's Ward in 1885 and 1886. He owned a leather goods business. Pepler was a member of L.O.L. No. 140 and he died April 26, 1890.

James Phinnemore

James Phinnemore was born in Cornwall, England in 1864 and came to Canada in 1882. He owned a painting and decorating business and sat on Toronto Council in 1920 – 1921 as an alderman from Ward 5. He was identified as an Orangeman in “The Municipality of Toronto: A History”.

William Rothwell Plewman

William Plewman was born in Bristol, England on August 3, 1880 and came to Canada in 1888. He left school at the age of 13 and was a messenger boy and typesetter for Toronto’s Methodist Book Room. He joined ‘The Toronto News’ as a reporter in 1889 and stayed with the paper until it changed ownership in 1903. He then joined the ‘Toronto Star’ and became the only Conservative reporter on a Liberal newspaper. In June of 1904 he married Claribel Hocken, the daughter of H. C. Hocken who had been one of the founders of the ‘Toronto Star’ and who was then the owner and editor of ‘The Sentinel’, the official voice of the Canadian Orange Lodges. In 1912 Plewman left the ‘Star’ to become the editor of ‘The Sentinel’ but this only lasted for fifteen months as he quit the Sentinel over a matter of principle. Plewman was a Conservative but was a supporter of prohibition. He was a straight laced, non smoking, teetotaler and he broke with his father-in-law over giving editorial support to the Conservative candidates in the Ontario provincial election who opposed prohibition.

Back at ‘The Star’ in 1914 he became the lead writer on Canada’s war effort during W.W. 1. He proved to be a brilliant analyst and the accuracy of his columns was second to none. On May 15, 1919 the Winnipeg general strike started. It quickly escalated into a huge story that the rest of the nation wanted kept up to date on. Plewman was sent to Winnipeg to cover the strike and he did so in his usual pay attention to detail manner. While other papers were labeling the striking workers as Bolsheviks and trouble makers, Plewman wrote that the strikers were only asking for the right of collective bargaining and a fair living wage. His coverage of the Winnipeg strike was not only to push the circulation of ‘The Star’ past that of ‘The Telegram’, but it made the name of Plewman a household word. He was one of a very few editorial writers that gave a balanced view of the strike and why it happened. He was elected as an alderman for Ward 5 in 1918, 1919, and 1922.

Plewman was once again to be the lead reporter for ‘The Star’ on Canada’s war effort in World War 2. He wrote a daily column titled “The War Reviewed” and it proved to be the most read column of any Toronto paper during the second world war. Plewman was the author of four books; “My Diary of the Great War”’ – 1918, “The People’s War Book” – 1919, “Pictorial History of the Great War” – 1919 and Adam Beck and the Ontario Hydro” – 1947. He retired from ‘The Star’ in 1955 after fifty years on its staff. William Plewman was an Orangeman, a member of Queen City L.O.L. No. 857 and he died on September 24, 1963.

Joseph George Ramsden

George Ramsden was born at Thornhill, Ontario on July 3, 1867. His first taste of politics came when he worked on a by-election in the riding of York East for the Liberal Party. He was the Chief Inspector with the Department of Indian Affairs for fifteen years before turning to municipal politics in Toronto. He owned a bakery and an electrical contracting business in Toronto and was heavily involved in municipal politics. He served as an alderman on Toronto city council for Ward 3 in 1903 – 1904, 1915 – 1919, 1925 – 1926 and 1930 and served for six years on the Toronto Board of Control. He contested Toronto’s mayoralty race in 1935 and was defeated, finishing third behind James Simpson and Harry Hunt (both of them were Orangemen –ar). George Ramsden was a past master of Cavan Black Red L.O.L. No. 657 and he died on December 28, 1946 (1948).

Marmaduke Rawlinson

Marmaduke Rawlinson was born in England in 1852 and came to Canada in the 1880’s. He founded a successful storage and cartage company on Yonge Street, Toronto. A member of Medcalf L.O.L. No. 781 he served on Toronto city council as an alderman for Ward 3 1911 - 1913. He died in 1922.

David Breckenridge Read

David Read was born on June 13, 1823 in Augusta, Upper Canada. Although he was to be the fourteenth mayor of the city of Toronto, in reality he was a caretaker mayor, serving the shortest term ever in the office. He was elected as the interim mayor by the city council on November 11, 1858, to fill the remainder of the term of office left unfilled by the resignation of William Henry Boulton. It was his first term on the city council and is likely that he was chosen so as to not allow anyone running for the office of mayor in the next election an unfair advantage.

Read only served until the end of the year and then not only declined to run for the office of Mayor, but declined to run again for any office. He had been educated at Upper Canada College and had been called to the bar of Upper Canada in 1845. He practiced law in Toronto and was elected a bencher of the law Society in 1855. He was appointed a commissioner for consolidating the statutes of Upper Canada in 1856, and he was appointed as a Q.C. in 1858.

After his retirement from the practice of law in 1881, he became quite prominent as an historian. He was a member of the Ontario Historical Society and served as president of the York Pioneers. In this capacity he published several books; "Lives of the Judges of Upper Canada", "The Rebellion of 1837", "The Lieutenant-Governors of Upper Canada and Ontario", "The Life and Times of General John Graves Simcoe", and "The Life and Times of Major General Sir Isaac Brock". Read passed away in Toronto on May 11, 1904.

Joseph (John) Reed

Reed was elected as a Councilman for St. David’s ward in 1859, 1861 and 1862. He turned on the Orange Order in 1859 and cast the deciding vote prohibiting Orangemen from joining the Toronto police force.

Leonard Mackenzie Reilly

Len Reilly was born July 12, 1912. His parents had emigrated from Ireland and they owned a grocery store. Reilly was the 13th of 16 children and he opened a locksmith business. He entered political life by winning a seat on Toronto Council representing Ward 9 in 1947. He was reelected in 1948 and he was defeated as a candidate for the Toronto Board of Control in 1949. He was reelected to city council in 1952 – 1955. He was elected to the Ontario Legislature in 1962 as a Conservative in the riding of Eglinton and held the seat until his retirement from politics in 1975. Reilly was a member of L.O.L. 2793 and he died in 2008.

The following is from the December, 1954, issue of 'The Sentinel':

"Belfast Purple Star L.O.L. 875 were hosts to the Toronto City Police Department of November 3 in the Western District Hall, when a Police and Remembrance Night was held. A police degree team under P/S Barney Sithes, P.M. of L.O.L. 2793, had the pleasure of initiating six members of the Police Department from Number One Division....The degree was exemplified by these Orange members of the police department in a manner which thrilled all who witnessed it...His Worship, Mayor Leslie Saunders, Deputy Grand Master of British America and Chairman of the Honourable Board of Police Commissioners, was the speaker of the evening...Among other speakers heard were Inspector John Cobb, No. 1 Division and James Murphy J.P., Past County Master who were also members of the degree team and Alderman Len Reilly of L.O.L. 2793."

John Richardson

John L. Richardson was a Toronto alderman in 1901 and was a member of Beaver L.O.L. No. 911.

Dr. Charles Abner Risk

C. A. Risk was a dentist who opened his practice at 186 Yonge St. in 1891. He was elected as an alderman in Ward 2; 1911 -1916 and 1918 and 1926 and 1927. He was a member of William III L.O.L. No. 140.

William Dullam Robbins

William Robbins was born in 1874 and served eighteen years on Toronto city council and the Board of Control before becoming mayor. He was appointed mayor after the death of incumbent Sam McBride and remained in office until defeated by Ralph Day in the 1937 elections. Robbins was considered a representative of labour in Toronto city politics, but was also a member of the Conservative Party. He served 18 years on city council and the Board of Control before becoming mayor. Robbins was a member of Boyne L.O.L. No. 173 and he died in 1952.

Dr. William Norrie Robertson

William Robertson was born in Stratford, Ontario on February 8, 1865 and was educated at Pickering College and Victoria University. A physician and surgeon, he was also a champion cyclist. He was the author of ‘Cycling’, published in 1894 and ‘Yukon Memories, Sourdough tells of Chaos and Changes in the Klondike Vale. He was elected as an alderman in Ward 8 (East Toronto) in 1925. Robertson was a member of Thistle L.O.L. No. 2974 and died on February 19, 1934.

Henry Rowland

Henry Adams Rowland was born in Newcastle, Ontario in 1873. A druggist, he was elected as an alderman for Ward 2, 1910 – 1914 and was a member of Medcalf L.O.L. No. 781.

Baird Ryckman

Baird Ryckman was a Toronto lawyer and he served on Toronto Council in 1931 and 1932 as the alderman from Ward 4. He was a member of McKinley L.O.L. No. 275.

Samuel Ryding

Samuel Ryding was a member of Toronto Council for most years between 1912 and 1928 representing Ward 7. Previous to that he had been the mayor of Toronto Junction. Ryding was a member of L.O.L. No. 900 and L.O.L. No. 2142.

Leslie Howard Saunders

Les Saunders was born in Essex, England on September 12,1899 and came with his family to North Bay, Ontario in 1906. He enlisted in the 97th Regiment Algonquin Rifles in November, 1916 and went overseas in 1916 with the 159th Battalion. He was wounded twice in France and was sent home in 1917. He later served on the Provincial Command of the Great War Veterans Association from 1918 - 1926, and on the executive of the Royal Canadian Legion in Ontario from 1926 - 1930.

He married Rose Clarke of Englehart, Ontario in 1921 in what was the first Salvation Army marriage performed in North Bay. He was elected a member of the North Bay town council in 1923 and served on council for six years before moving to Toronto in 1928 as business manager of ‘The Sentinel’. During the time that he sat on council North Bay was made a city - 1925 and so Saunders was a member of the first city council of North Bay.

Saunders noted in his memoirs that when the Grand Orange Lodge of Ontario West met in North Bay in 1925 that he welcomed the delegates on behalf of the city and informed them that all ten councillors were Protestant, six of whom were Orangemen.

He was first elected to Toronto city council in 1942, a year that saw sixteen of the twenty-three councillors being Orangemen. He later served as mayor of Toronto in 1954 and as mayor of East York from 1976 - 1978. In all, he served a total of thirty-seven years as an elected official in municipal politics.

Les Saunders Orange career began with his initiation into L.O.L. No. 876, North Bay, on July 11, 1918 - he served as the lodge master in 1922. He was the County Master of Nipissing in 1924 and served as Grand Master of Ontario West from 1929 - 1931. On his move to Toronto he joined L.O.L. No. 375 and remained a member there until 1944, when he formed L.O.L. No. 137. He was the Grand Master of Canada in 1957 - 1960 and 1964 - 1967, and served as President of the Imperial Grand Orange Council of the World from 1967 - 1970.

A life-long member of the Salvation Army, Les Saunders died on March 30, 1994. Truly the man was one of the giants of Canadian Orangeism. A forceful, informed speaker, frequently controversial, his critics respected his strongly-held convictions. He was an authority as a writer and speaker on the public/separate school issue, and it was said that he had championed the public school cause "on a thousand platforms in Ontario. This small biographical sketch certainly doesn’t do the man justice and for those interested in more information I would recommend the book, ‘An Orangeman in Public Life’ - his autobiography.

Robert Hood Saunders

Robert Saunders was born in Toronto on May 30, 1903. He graduated from Osgoode Law School and was called to the bar in 1928. He entered Toronto municipal politics in 1934 and was elected as an alderman and reelected for three more terms. He was then elected as a city Controller for four years. He held several titles – President of the Canadian National Exhibition , Chairman of Ontario Hydro, mayor of Toronto - it was Saunders who started the Elmer the Safety Elephant campaign in 1946. He served as the mayor of Toronto from 1945 – 1948. During his term as Chairman of Ontario Hydro he was the main instigator in building the St. Lawrence seaway. Saunders, who was a member of Eldon L.O.L. No. 136, was killed in a plane crash on January 15, 1955.

William John Saunderson

William Saunderson was born in County Fermanagh, Ireland in 1862. He moved to Toronto in March of 1884 and in 1912 he established a liquid soap and oil company which became a huge success. He was also president of the Riverdale Leather Company and was heavily involved in Toronto municipal politics. He was the President of the Ward One Conservative Association in 1905 – 1906 and was elected as the ward’s alderman in 1907 – 1908 and 1912. Saunderson was a member and past master of Dalton McCarthy L.O.L. No. 1084 and he served as President of the Don Rowing Club from 1916 – 1919.

J. Louis Shannon

J. Louis Shannon was born in Vankleek Hill, Ontario in 1898 and moved to Toronto at the age of seven. He graduated from McMaster University and opened a law practice in Toronto. He was first elected to Toronto City Council in 1937, representing Ward 2. He ran for the Liberal Party in the riding of Rosedale in 1940, but was defeated by Harry Jackman. Shannon was a member of Boyne L.O.L. No. 173 and he died on February 16, 1954.

John Shaw

John Shaw was born in Toronto in 1837. He attended Upper Canada College, and Victoria College and apprenticed in the law firm of Patterson and Harris. He was called to the bar in 1870 and soon established his own practice. He lived in the village of Yorkville on Bloor Street West and when Yorkville was annexed by Toronto in 1883 he was elected to represent the village [St Paul's Ward] on city council.

He represented St Paul's until 1891 when the electoral boundaries were changed but continued to sit in city council until 1895 as the alderman for Ward 3. Shaw, who was a member of McKinley L.O.L. 275, ran for mayor in 1896 but was defeated by R.J. Fleming. In 1897, while he sat in council as alderman for Ward 3, he was elected Mayor of Toronto by city council to replace Fleming, who had resigned to become the city assessment commissioner.

He was re-elected in 1898 and 1899, both times defeating E.A. Macdonald. The most important event of Shaw's term of office was the completion of the city hall on Queen Street, which was designed by fellow Orangeman E.J. Lennox. In September of 1899 the official opening took place. Shaw presided over the establishment of the Toronto and Hudson's Bay Railway Commission, which was to study the feasability of building a railway from Toronto to Hudson's Bay.

Shaw left politics following his 1899 term as mayor but returned to council in 1904 and 1905 as a member of the board of control. In 1908, he was elected to the provincial legislature as the member for Toronto North and in 1911 he retired from politics for good. Shaw died in Toronto on November 7, 1917.

William Henry Shaw

W. H. Shaw was born in Kent County, Ontario on April 1, 1858. He was the founder and president of Shaw Business Schools, Toronto. He was the chairman of the Toronto Board of Education in 1905. He is identified as an Orangeman in the National Reference Book on Canadian Men and Women – 1936. He sat on Toronto City Council as a member of the Board of Control in 1917. He ran for the mayor’s office in 1919 but came in fourth – of the four candidates running, three of them were Orangemen. He also represented Ward 2 as an alderman in 1923.

Joseph Sheard

Joseph Sheard was born in Yorkshire, England in 1813 and came to Canada in 1833. He had paid for his own passage with money saved for some years through his job as a carpenter. He eventually made his way to York [Toronto] and stayed in "Macaulay Town", a working class neighbourhood near the present day Bay and Queen streets. He plied his trade as a carpenter and bought a house on McGill Street.

Sheard had first made his mark on Toronto following the Upper Canada Rebellion when he refused to help in the construction of the gallows used to hang Peter Mathews and Samuel Lount. He soon built his small carpentry business into a large concern and eventually he not only built homes but designed them as well. His new venture into architecture was a success and he designed the Ontario Bank Building and Cawthra House.

He began his political career in 1851 when he sat as an alderman for St Patrick’s Ward. He was to represent this ward for over twenty years and in 1871 he was the unanimous choice of Toronto city council for the position of Mayor. He served another term in 1872 and then returned to the rank of aldermen where he served St Patrick’s Ward until 1876. His term as mayor was uneventful and no major changes took place during his term. He seems to have been a competent politician who made few enemies. Sheard died on August 30, 1883 in Toronto and the site of his house on McGill Street is now a city park named after him.

Henry Sherwood

Henry Sherwood was born in Augusta Township, Upper Canada in 1807. He was elected to the parliament of Upper Canada representing Brockville in 1836. In 1841 he joined forces with Toronto mayor George Monro and they ran for the Tory party for the government of Canada West. Both men were members of the Orange Order and with the Order’s backing and the support of the Family Compact they were expected to win easily. In a shock result they were defeated by the Reformers. The following day the Reformers held a victory parade in Toronto and as they passed the Coleraine Tavern trouble broke out.

The tavern was owned by Samuel Sherwood, Henry’s brother and was a noted Orange gathering place. Conflicting reports gave blame for the firing of the first shot to both sides. A full scale riot erupted with one man being killed. Sherwood was elected as mayor of Toronto in 1842, succeeding George Monro and served until 1844. He was elected to the first parliament of the Province of Canada in 1843 and in 1847 he served as the Joint Premier of the Province of Canada for Canada West with D. Papineau representing Canada East. He was elected as an alderman for St. David’s Ward, 1845 – 1847 and as alderman for St. James Ward in 1848 and 1849. He died in Bavaria while travelling through Europe in July, 1855.

Samuel Sherwood

Samuel Sherwood was elected as an alderman for St. George’s Ward in 1859 and 1860 and as a councilman for the same ward in 1861. He was the Chief of Police for Toronto from 1853 – 1858.

George Sylvester Shields

George Sylvester Shields was born in Toronto on February 27, 1872 and he sat on the Toronto Council in 1923, as an alderman for Ward 8. He was the editorial cartoonist for the Toronto Telegram for a number of years. He was elected to the Ontario Legislature in 1926 as the Conservative member for Toronto – Greenwood. He was identified as an Orangeman in the Conservative Party convention book of 1927. Shields was a member of Sproule L.O.L. No. 2253 and he died in 1952.

Robert Siberry

Robert Siberry sat on Toronto City Council as an alderman from Ward 1 in 1927 – 1932. He ended his days in politics on a sour note because of his vocal anti Semitism. He was a member of L.O.L. No. 2097.

James Simpson

James Simpson was born in England on December 14, 1873. A committed socialist in politics, he was an active trade unionist. He served three times as Vice President of the Trades and Labor Congress of Canada – 1904 – 1909, 1916 – 1917, and 1924 -1936. He entered Toronto Municipal politics as a school trustee on the Toronto Board of Education, serving from 1905 – 1910. He was a member of the Toronto Board of Control in 1914 and 1930 – 1934.

Simpson was one of the leaders of the Ontario Labor Party in the 1920’s and had run as a candidate for the Canadian House of Commons under the banner of the Canadian Labour Party. Although he was a committed socialist Simpson strongly opposed Communism in the Labour Party and after the Communist bloc in the party convinced the Labor Party to withdraw its support of Simpson in his bid for a seat on the Toronto Board of Control in 1927, Simpson and his supporters quit the party causing it to collapse and fade away. He then formed the Toronto Labor Party which excluded Communists from membership. In 1934 he ran as a C.C.F. candidate for the Board of Control and he was elected and in 1935 he defeated fellow Orangeman Harry Hunt for the Mayoralty of Toronto. The only Toronto newspaper to support him had been the Toronto Star and he lost their support in his bid for reelection in 1936 because of his anti Catholic statements. Jimmy Simpson, trade unionist, supporter of the Canadian Labour Party and committed social activist died in Toronto on September 24, 1938. Simpson was a member of Queen City L.O.L. No. 857.

George Joseph Smith

George Smith sat on Toronto City Council in 1924, 1925 and 1926 as an alderman for Ward 1. He was elected to the Ontario Legislature as the Conservative member for the riding of Greenwood and held the seat until 1934. He was a member of Boyne L.O.L. No. 173.

James Edward Smith

Born in London, England, December 25, 1831 Smith came to Toronto with his family in 1841. He was a manager of the British Empire Life Insurance Company. He was elected to the Toronto City Council in 1857 for the St. John's ward and served until appointed mayor by his fellow Councillors in 1867. He was mayor until 1869 when he was re-elected to the City Council. He remained in Council until 1870 when he retired. Smith died March 9, 1892.

William John Smith

Wm. Smith was born in Toronto on October 8, 1832. He was elected as an alderman in St Matthew’s Ward in 1885. He is identified as an Orangeman in “Cyclopedia of Canadian Biography, 1886.

David Spence

David Spence was born in County Armagh, Ireland on January 25, 1867. He came to Canada in 1888 and settled in Toronto where he became a wholesale fruit dealer. He was a member of Toronto city council from 1910 – 1916 and served as a Captain in the Toronto Irish Regiment from 1916 – 1918. He was a member of the Toronto and York Roads Commission and was President of the Irish Rifle Club which was organized in 1911. He was elected to the Canadian House of Commons as a Conservative for the riding of Parkdale in 1921 and was reelected in 1925, 1926, 1930 and 1935. Spence was a member of Parkdale L.O.L. No. 207 and he died on February, 1940.

Francis Stephens Spence

Frank Spence was born in County Donegal, Ireland on March 27, 1850 and came to Upper Canada with his parents in 1861, settling in Toronto. He taught school at Lundy’s Lane, Prescott and Toronto where he was promoted to headmaster. In 1883 he left teaching to become the editor of the Canada Citizen and Temperance Herald. The temperance movement was to become his lifetime commitment and he campaigned nonstop for over thirty years trying to have Ontario in the prohibition camp. In 1902 he founded “The Pioneer” which became the official organ of the Ontario temperance movement. Spence was a member of the Toronto school board in 1887 – 1888 and he was elected as an alderman for Ward 2 in the following years: 1896 – 1897, 1899 – 1900, 1902 – 1905, and 1914. He was elected to the Toronto Board of Control in 1904 – 1905, 1908, 1910 – 1911, and 1915. He ran for the mayor’s office in 1905 and 1911, losing both times because of his stated aim to force prohibition in the city of Toronto. Spence died on March 8, 1917 in Toronto after a bout of pneumonia. The story of his life’s work for the temperance movement was published by his daughter Ruth Elizabeth Spence in 1919, titled “PROHIBITION IN CANADA: a memorial to Frances Stephens Spence”.

James Spence

James Spence was born in County Armagh in 1808 and was a carpenter. He was elected to represent St John’s ward in 1873 – 1874.

James Russell Lovett Starr

James Russell Lovell Starr was born at Grimsby, Ontario on October 5, 1865. He graduated from Victoria College with a B.A. in 1885 and with an LL.B. in 1890 and was called to the bar the same year. He set up his law practice in Toronto and was given the title of K.C. in 1908. He was a member of the Public School Board for seven years and was also a member of the Toronto Board of Trade. He served as an alderman on Toronto Council for two years before resigning to attend to his law practice. He was very active in the Conservative Party and attended as a delegate from Toronto the 1927 Liberal Conservative convention held at Winnipeg, Manitoba to elect a new leader for the party. Identified as an Orangeman in the Conservative Party convention book of 1927.

William James Stewart, C.B.E.

W. J. Stewart was born in Toronto on February 13, 1889. From 1924 to 1930 he served as the alderman for Ward 5. He was elected mayor of Toronto in 1930 and held the office until 1934 when he decided to retire from the office. In 1938 he was elected to the Ontario Legislature as the Conservative M.P.P. for the riding of Parkdale and he held the seat for over two decades until 1959. He served as the Speaker of the Ontario Legislature in 1944. One of his greatest accomplishments was in spearheading the building of Sunnybrook Hospital for injured war veterans. In 1961 he was appointed chairman of the Toronto Historical Board and held the position until he passed away on September 18, 1969. W. J. Stewart was a past master of Cavan Black Red L.O.L. No. 657 and also held membership in William G. Armstrong L.O.L. No. 3271.

William Templeton Stewart

William T. Stewart was a Toronto alderman for Ward 1 in 1893 – 1894 and 1899 and 1906. He was a member of Prince of Orange L.O.L. No. 111 and was a Past Master of L.O.L. No. 455.

George Johnston St. Leger

G. J. St. Leger was born in Belfast and came to Canada c.1871. He founded a large mercantile store on Queen Street W. He was elected as mayor of Toronto Junction and served three years on Toronto Council representing St. Patrick’s Ward, 1887 - 1889. He attended the formation of Aughrim Rose of Derry L.O.L. No. 2159 in 1910 and was listed as a past master. His home was named Clandeboye and was added to Toronto’s High Park after his death.

July 12/1915 - Toronto Lodge Contributes to War Effort

Patriotic fervour and support of the War effort were no doubt running rampant when Queen City L.O.L. 857 met on the morning of July 12th, 1915. The following is a newspaper account of what transpired at that meeting:

Queen City L.O.L. Donates $765.

Contributions Sufficient at Early Session to Buy a Machine-Gun

Queen City L.O.L.857 today subscribed $765.00, to buy a machine-gun for the British Government.

The lodge met in the Metropolitan Methodist (United) Church prior to parading to Exhibition Park. Ex-Alderman, G. J. St.Leger, moved that a subscription for the purchase of a gun be started and the Worshipful Master, A. R. Hassard declared "there was no time like the present."

A member enquired, "How much does a machine-gun cost." Another replied, "$765.00."
Mr. St.Leger noted he would "pay whatever balance there may be after the subscriptions were all in."

Mr. St.Leger and Mr. John Farquhar were appointed treasurers, and lists prepared by Mr. Hassard were passed round among the two hundred members of the lodge who were present. Ten-dollar and five-dollar subscriptions came pouring in, and the sum was soon raised.

Thereupon the lodge sang "God Save the King" and went off to enjoy itself at the Exhibition Grounds.


Source: The Toronto Star, July 15, 1915

William Strachan

William Strachan was a member of York L.O.L. No. 375 and served as master of the lodge in 1855. He served as Orange County Master of York in 1857 and as Junior Deputy Grand Master of the Grand Orange Lodge of Ontario West in 1861. He was elected as alderman for the St. Lawrence Ward in 1856, 1858 and 1860 – 1870. In 1858 he was listed as the Grand Treasurer for the G.O.L. of Canada.

Don Summerville

Donald Summerville was born in Toronto in 1915 and was the son of William Summerville, an Orangeman who had served as a Toronto alderman and as a Toronto M.P.P. in the Ontario Legislature. He served in the Royal Canadian Air Force during World War Two and was the manager of Summerville Properties. He entered political life being elected as an alderman n Ward 8 in 1955 and held the office until 1958. He served on the Toronto Board of Control from 1959 – 1961. He was elected as Mayor of Toronto in 1962 and was still mayor when he suffered a heart attack while playing in a charity hockey game. He died on November 19, 1963. Don Summerville was a member of Riverdale L.O.L. No. 2097.

William Arthur Summerville

Bill Summerville was born in Cargill, Bruce County, Ontario on July 8, 1879. He was fascinated with show business at an early age and went on a cross country tour as a youngster of nineteen. A cornet player, he had played with the 48th Highlanders band when he was just ten years old and he was a member of the “William West Minstrel Show”. He was the father of future mayor of Toronto, Don Summerville and was the main concert promoter in the east end of Toronto. In 1908 he started to sell real estate and in 1912 he opened up his own real estate company on Danforth Avenue in the east end of the city.

He got into municipal politics in 1920 winning a seat on the Toronto Board of Education, and in 1922 he was elected to city council for Ward 1 in 1922. He would continue to represent Ward 1 until 1933, and served on the Toronto Board of Control for two years. He was elected to the Ontario Legislature in 1937, winning the riding of Riverdale for the Conservative Party. He would hold the riding until 1943. He was a member of Riverdale L.O.L. 2097 and Temple R.B.P. 292.

W. W. Sweet

William Sweet was the master of Duke of York L.O.L. No. 396 in 1900.

Brook Sykes

Brook Sykes was born in Yorkshire, England on October 19, 1884 and came to Canada in 1904. He was a successful building contractor in Toronto and he was elected as an alderman to the Toronto City Council from Ward 6 in 1918 – 1925, and in 1927. He ran for mayor in 1929, losing to fellow Orangeman Sam McBride. Sykes was a member of William III L.O.L. No. 140.

Joseph Elijah Thompson

Joseph Elijah Thompson was born on July 19, 1867 in Toronto and grew up in the Cabbagetown area of the city. In 1889 he secured employment as a clerk in the City of Toronto’s treasurer’s office. In 1907 he was appointed as Commissioner of Industry and Publicity for the city of Toronto. He left this office in 1908 and established his own insurance broker’s business.

In 1915 he was elected to Toronto’s Board of Control for the first of two terms. His term on the Board was interrupted when he volunteered for service in the Canadian Armed Forces. He served as a captain with the Canadian Expeditionary Force and took part in the Allied occupation of Germany. He was discharged in 1919 and resumed his business and political career.

In 1919 he was elected to the Ontario Legislature as the Conservative member for the riding of Toronto Northeast and was given the position of Conservative party whip when the Legislature opened in March of 1920. As a result of holding this position he chaired the 1920 Ontario Conservative Party leadership convention.

He was re-elected in 1923 and in February, 1924 was elected as Speaker of the Ontario Legislature. He retired from this position in 1926 and that same year was elected in the riding of St. David in Toronto with an overwhelming majority. He did not seek re-election in 1929 and retired from provincial politics. Thompson was a member of Medcalf L.O.L. No. 781 in Toronto and served as County Master of Toronto in 1907 and 1908. Joseph Elijah Thompson died on March 16, 1941 in Toronto.

Samuel Thompson

Samuel Thompson was born on August 27, 1810 in London, England and came to Upper Canada in 1833. For the first few years he tried farming with his brothers near Bradford, Ontario but in 1837 he moved to Toronto where he took up his trade as a printer. During the Upper Canada Rebellion Thompson was a member of the Toronto militia and fought against William Lyon Mackenzie even though like many other Orangemen of the time he was a Reformer.

In 1838 he became editor of the "Upper Canada Mercantile Advertiser" a Toronto newspaper. In 1848 he became editor of the "Toronto Patriot" and the next year, in partnership with Ogle Gowan, he purchased the paper. The partnership with Gowan lasted until 1853 when it was dissolved with hard feelings on both sides. That year he bought the "British Colonist" and with the financing of John Hillyard Cameron he saw the paper’s circulation rise to over 25,000.

In 1858 he was awarded the government printing contract and he moved to Quebec with the legislature. This was to prove to be a bad move on Thompson’s part. While doing the government printing he also published a small newspaper, the "Quebec Weekly Advertiser". The government cut back on the amount spent on printing and Thompson had a hard time financially. The breaking point came when several Quebec politicians accused him of libeling them in his paper and Thompson received death threats and threats to burn his business down.

He moved back to Toronto in 1860 and became managing director of the Beaver Mutual Fire Insurance Association until 1876 when the company was declared insolvent. During his earlier stay in Toronto Thompson had served as a councillor for St. George’s Ward from 1849 - 1854. In 1883 he accepted a position as a librarian for the city of Toronto and kept that position until his death. In 1884 he published his memoirs: "Reminiscences of a Canadian pioneer for the last fifty years: an autobiography" Samuel Thompson died in Toronto on July 8, 1886.

Thomas Thompson

Tom Thompson was born in Yorkshire, England in 1824 and came to Canada in 1848. He was a harness maker and he formed #10 Company of the 10th Royals. He held the rank of captain and served at the Battle of Fort Erie. He was a member of Toronto L.O.L. No. 127 and was elected as a councilman for St. Lawrence ward, 1861 – 1864 served as an alderman in the same ward, 1865 - 1868. Thompson died in 1902.

Richard H. Thornhill

Thornhill was elected as an alderman for St. Patrick Ward,1835 - 1837. Identified as an orangeman in 'From the Boyne to Brampton'.

George Tizard

George Langrish Tizard was born in Weymouth, England on June 11, 1841. He served as an alderman for St. John’s Ward 1878 – 1879. He was a member of L.O.L. No. 375 and was the master of Toronto Centre District in 1877 and was also County Master of Toronto Royal Black Knights.

Joseph T. Turner

Joseph Turner was elected as an alderman for Ward 8 in 1924.

Robert Crawford Vaughan

Robert Vaughan was a Toronto alderman for Ward 4 in 1905 - 1907 and 1909. He was a Toronto police officer before starting a successful building contractor business. Vaughan was a member of William III L.O.L. No. 140. He died in 1925.

George W. Verrall

George W. Verrall was born in Sussex, England on March 5, 1829 and came to Canada in 1846. He started a livery and horse boarding business and started a cab company which became the second largest cab company in Toronto. He was elected as an alderman in St. George’s Ward for seven years 1885 – 1891 and he was elected alderman in Ward 4 in 1892 and 1893. Verrall was a member of Martin Luther L.O.L. No. 479 and he died in 1911. His son, George W. carried on the business and was also a member of L.O.L. No. 479.

History of Toronto and the County of York – 1885; Cyclopedia of Canadian Biography – 1886

William J. Wadsworth

William Wadsworth was born in Ceylon, Grey County, Ontario, on May 8, 1885. He moved to Toronto with his family when he was a youth. He worked at the treasury department before founding the “Wadsworth Coal Company”. He was elected in 1927 and held the office until he was elected to the Toronto Board of Control in 1935. He remained the office until 1946 when he was defeated by fellow Orangeman John Innes. Wadsworth died in 1949.

Dr. William Rundle Walters

William Rundle Walters was born in Audley, Pickering Township, Ontario in 1867. He graduated from the University of Toronto in 1887. Although technically not a Toronto politician, the jurisdictions that he served were eventually swallowed up by the fast growing city of Toronto. He served on the York County School Board, 1887 – 1889 and was a York County councillor, 1890, 1891. He was the Reeve of East Toronto for eight years and Mayor of East Toronto for four years and led the amalgamation with Toronto in 1924. He represented Ward 8 on the Toronto Board of Education from 1925 – 1930, serving as Chairman in 1930. Walters died on October 14, 1930.

Charles A. Walton

Charles Walton was born in Toronto and attended Earl Grey Public School, Riverdale Collegiate and Shaw's Business School. He pursued a career in real estate and was involved with Billy Summerville in the construction and operation of the Eastwood and Prince of Wales Theatres in Toronto. Walton became active in civic affairs when he was elected to the Toronto city council in 1945. He served until 1949, when he was appointed to the Toronto Transit Commission, and served continuously until 1968. Walton was appointed Chairman effective January 3, 1959 following the sudden resignation of Allan Lamport. He served as Chairman until 1960, when he was replaced by Clarence Downey. At that time, he became Vice-Chairman of the TTC and President of Gray Coach Lines, posts he held until his term on the Commission expired in early 1968, when he was not re-appointed by Metro Council in an effort to bring fresh faces to the Commission.

John Wanless

John Wanless was born in Toronto on August 28, 1862. A jeweler, he sat on York Township council, 1903 - 1905. He sat on the Toronto Council as an alderman from Ward 4, 1912 – 1914 and on the Toronto Board of Education, 1921 and 1922. Wanless was a member of Lansdowne L.O.L. No. 469.

Charles Ward

Charles Ward was elected to Toronto City Council, representing Ward 4 in 1930. He was a member of Ulster Black Watch L.O.L. No. 675.

Simon Washburn

Simon Ebenezer Washburn was born in 1794 in Fredericksburgh Township, Upper Canada. He served in the Canadian militia during the War of 1812 and then studied law under William Baldwin at York [Toronto] and was called to the bar in January, 1820. He practiced law with Baldwin until he opened his own law office in 1825. He was Clerk of the Peace for the Home District from October 1828 until his death in 1837. In May, 1829 he became reporter to the Court of King’s Bench, a position that he resigned from just six months later because his law practice was too busy for him to devote time to the job.

In 1830 there was a scandal in York when it was alleged that Washburn had bribed a customs officer by paying him seventy-five pounds to release a shipment of pork which had been allegedly smuggled into the city by one of his clients, William Bergin. The payment had been arranged by Washburn’s brother-in-law, James Fitzgibbon, clerk of the House of Assembly who was charged with bribery. Washburn managed to come out of the affair with his reputation intact.

In 1830 and 1832 he ran against William Lyon Mackenzie in two elections for the House of Assembly seat in York County but lost each time. Despite this Washburn was one of the Orangemen who managed to keep open the lines of communication between Mackenzie and his arch-rivals, the Orangemen. In 1837 he was elected as an alderman for St David’s Ward in Toronto, and by 1835 he had been appointed as the colonel of the 2nd Regiment of West York militia. He was active in St James Anglican Church and served as churchwarden.

William Lyon Mackenzie had a soft spot in his heart for Washburn and in one of the few times that he praised a political opponent he said that Washburn had been "kind and generous" and referred to his public actions on behalf of blacks and those accused of minor crimes in which cases he provided his services as a lawyer for free. He died in Toronto on September 29, 1837 in Toronto.

William Henry Weir

W. H. Weir was an alderman in Ward 7, 1915 - 1918. He was identified as an Orangeman in The Sentinel issue of January 3, 1918.

Bert Wemp

Bert Wemp was born in Tweed, Ontario in 1889 and moved with his family to Toronto at a young age. After high school he got a job with The Toronto Telegram in 1905 and was to work for them until his retirement in 1964. He served as a pilot during World War One with the 118th Squadron, Royal Navy Air Service and was the first Canadian to be accepted to the British flying service during the war. Wemp was the first Canadian to be awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.

In 1922 he was elected as a school trustee with the Toronto Board of Education and served two years in the position. He was elected as alderman in Ward 2 in 1924 and 1925 and was a member of the Toronto Board of Control from 1917 – 1929. He was elected mayor of Toronto in 1930 and served for one year then returned to his job as City Editor of the Telegram. Bert Wemp was a member of Medcalf L.O.L. No. 781 and he died on February 11, 1976.

Peter Bennett Whytock

Peter Whytock was born in Perthshire Scotland on January 8, 1847. He was a butcher by trade and he was elected as an alderman for Ward 5 in 1907. He was identified as an Orangeman in the ‘Toronto Star’ in their reporting of the Toronto Orange Parade in 1907.

Melville Wilson

Melville Wilson sat on Toronto council as an alderman for Ward 9 in 1945, 1946 and 1947. He was identified as an Orangeman in the 1946 Report of Proceedings of the Grand Orange Lodge of Ontario West.

John Winnett

John Winnett was born in Toronto in 1866 and he was a carriage and wagon maker. He represented Ward 2 on Toronto city council for fifteen years. Winnett was a member of Queen City L.O.L. No. 857 and served as the Orange County Master of Toronto in 1925. He died in 1950.

Frank Woods

Francis Henry Woods was born in Toronto in 1856. He was a printer and real estate developer and was a member of Medcalf L.O.L. No. 781. He was elected as an alderman from Ward 5 from 1897 – 1899 and 1902 – 1903.

Joseph Wright

Joseph Wright was born in Lincolnshire, England in 1847 and came to Canada in 1854. He was elected as an alderman in St. Patrick’s Ward, Toronto – 1876 – 1877. Identified as an Orangeman in Cyclopedia of Canadian Biography – 1886.

“Joseph Wright, chemist and druggist, 100 Queen Street West. This business was established first by Mr. Samuel Howarth, who continued up to 1862, when he was unfortunately burnt out, the building being entirely destroyed. The present building, now occupied by Mr. Wright, was moved to the vacant lot by Dr. Howson, who opened a drug store, which he conducted until 1871. Mr. J. Wright then joined him in the business, the firm being known as J. Wright & Co., until the death of Dr. Howson in 1878, since which time it has been wholly in the hands of Mr. Wright. He is a native of Lincolnshire, England, and came to Toronto in 1853. Since becoming a resident of the city he has taken great interest in municipal affairs.” – 1885.

Samuel Thomas Wright

S. T. Wright was born in Toronto on December 19, 1887. He enlisted in the 123rd Battalion, Royal Grenadiers, C.E.F. in December, 1915. Wright listed his occupation as a commission merchant on his military attestation records. He was elected to Toronto city council as an alderman for Ward 6 in 1925 and 1926. Wright was later elected to the Ontario Legislature as a Conservative in the riding of Dovercourt, 1926 – 1934.

Robert Maxwell Yeomans

Robert Yeomans was born in Wolverhampton, England in 1877. He was elected as an alderman in 1911 and 1912 representing Ward 2 but was defeated in 1913 and 1914 in his attempt to win a seat on the Board of Control. He was a member of Sproule L.O.L. No. 2253 and died in 1959.